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4 ways digital transformation has changed how business is done
Posted on Wednesday June 22, 2022

4 ways digital transformation has changed how business is done Vikas Gupta June 22, 2022 - 3:00am

Digital transformation is no longer an option; it’s a necessity – especially for global companies.

Understanding how digital transformation has changed companies both culturally and technologically is allowing business leaders to reevaluate their current processes and implement more digital and virtual operations across HR, product development, marketing, sales, and customer experience.

Here are four things that digital transformation has forever changed about the way companies operate.

1. Recruiting and hiring

Virtual work is one of the most important and all-encompassing paradigm shifts brought on by the global pandemic. Businesses were forced to change how they source, interview, hire, and onboard new employees.

[ Related read: Digital transformation: 3 ways it changes companies. ]

One instrumental change was companies’ reliance on virtual hiring and the ability to interview and recruit candidates from around the globe. Virtual recruitment has enabled companies to build more diverse workforces, tap into a larger talent pool, and consider the best available candidates rather than only those in their immediate locations. Just as virtual work has boosted the talent pool, digital transformation and the innovation it brings have heightened the demand and competition for developers, data scientists, and other tech talent.

The hiring process has also evolved as companies now have a better ability to assess candidates’ skills. While platforms for virtual assessments existed before the pandemic, many companies that provide these tools have enhanced their technologies to create programming that provides the best possible experience for candidates and employers. The trend of conducting skills assessments virtually during the hiring process is growing.

2. Employee experience

The pandemic pushed many companies to embrace hybrid and remote work, and many employees continue to work remotely. Digital transformation was both a result of and a catalyst for this change as it enabled employees to seamlessly transition to working from home. Digital transformation has provided innovative and essential new technologies, from videoconferencing software that replaced legacy platforms to cloud services that enable access to information and materials from anywhere.

Remote work has also changed how companies deal with and manage cybersecurity. With employees using different devices (often personal devices) and working from home wi-fi connections, companies have had to consider new vulnerabilities and strategies.

Finally, digital transformation has improved the employee experience by allowing employees to enjoy work flexibility. No longer forced to commute, team members can work from the comfort and convenience of their homes or any other location. This new model has also changed how employees interact with one another and altered how companies hire as they consider the preference for flexible work environments.

[ Read also: Using automation to improve employee experience ]

Companies that implement digital technologies into their business models offer customers more personalized experiences, perhaps through a web experience, a mobile app, or any digital touchpoint

3. Customer experience

Companies that implement digital technologies into their business models offer customers more personalized experiences, perhaps through a web experience, a mobile app, or any digital touchpoint. Digital payment options have increased rapidly, for example, with contactless and digital wallets enabling customers to pay for goods and services without cash or even swiping a credit card. Digital banking apps enable customers to conduct any kind of transaction, from depositing checks to applying for a loan. Last-mile delivery for grocery items has changed the way consumers shop, and advanced digital technology empowers companies to provide 1:1 personalization with their marketing campaigns.

[ Read next: Digital transformation: Maximize customer experience in 3 steps ]

According to Voxco, company growth and revenue increase 10-15 percent when companies integrate digital transformation into customer experiences. Not only does digital transformation help provide superior customer experiences, but it contributes heavily to company growth and profitability.

4. Workflows

Finally, company processes and workflows have changed dramatically over the past few years thanks to digital transformation. Legacy processes that were formerly done using pen and paper or a spreadsheet are being completely replaced with digital tools used by everyone from large manufacturers to sole-proprietor businesses.

Low-code and no-code software make it easy for non-technical employees to create and customize digital workflows from scratch. Workflow process automation has removed barriers, improving communication between marketing and IT teams. As companies embrace digital workflows, they are able to provide better customer experiences, which in turn boosts loyalty and customer lifetime value.

Digital transformation enables changes that play a crucial role in business success, and companies that fail to embrace digital will fall behind competitors and lose customers. From improving the customer experience, boosting employee engagement, and making internal processes more efficient, the benefits of digital transformation will continue to evolve as Web3 technologies come to market and change how companies do business in today’s on-demand economy.

[ Discover how priorities are changing. Get the Harvard Business Review Analytic Services report: Maintaining momentum on digital transformation. ]

From enabling virtual hiring to improving the customer experience, digital transformation has inexorably changed how companies do business. Here are four examples
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Article

I cant explain the feeling of getting scammed of your hard earned money and savings by some random people, that feeling of being worthless and just being one of the many random people who was foolish enough to give out your hard earned money to strangers without proper investigation. Well it is not always as simple as it looks, most of us still got seriously scammed not because we are dumb or foolish but because we met the wrong people at the wrong time, or we simply got unlucky.
i got severely wrecked after an investment scam i fell to in 2020 during covid. few weeks later i had covid and two months later i was almost homeless, my entire world was crumbling right before my eyes until i met this group of Hackers, they helped me recover my funds and worked on my credit, suggested legit investment companies for me, and today i am buying my 2nd house, i cant help but give them a review wherever i can today. they saved my life. if you have same situation, please dont hesitate to reach them
website: https://albarshazom.wixsite.com/blockwiz
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Diversity in IT: 3 key components to enable meaningful change
Posted on Monday June 20, 2022

Diversity in IT: 3 key components to enable meaningful change E.G. Nadhan June 20, 2022 - 3:00am

At a recent Tech Titans Industry luncheon, I had the honor of moderating with three distinguished leaders of change on how to improve diversity in IT: Michael Pegues, CIO, City of Aurora, IL; Tanya Hannah, former CIO, King County, State of Washington; and Onyeka Nchege, CIO, Novant Health.

While all three panelists agreed that the tech industry has a long way to go to become more inclusive, they shared some thought-provoking practices – and three imperatives – that IT leaders can apply in their own organizations. Let’s explore these.

1. Access matters

For Nchege, it’s about making sure that the upcoming generation gets pulled forward, and that its members have opportunities that he not only never had, but did not even know existed. “Each one reach one – each one teach one” is the mantra he advocates.

[ Also read 4 ways digital transformation enables a diverse, future-ready workforce. ]

Nchege says that Novant Health is developing a diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) program to reach young Black talent. The digital products and services organization (DPS) runs a student and team member career development program that offers paid and unpaid internships. Participants can work with the DPS team on opportunities that other internships don’t generally provide.

Hannah notes that King County in the State of Washington provides advice and guidance on technology, augmenting digital literacy by expanding broadband service. Internet affordability remains a problem for families in underserved communities, she points out, adding that when families don’t have access to the internet, they don’t have access to information.

The public and private sectors must come together to impact the community. When Pegues was offered the position of CTO for the City of Aurora, IL, he pushed for the CIO job instead. The reason, he explains, was that the CTO role focuses solely on technology, whereas the CIO has the opportunity to not only manage people in the company but also to enable outcomes for the people in the community. The role of the Public Sector CIO is not just about enabling the technology infrastructure and collaboration platforms for internal employees; it also includes purposeful engagement with the residents of the communities they serve directly or indirectly.

2. Engagement matters

Hannah learned to play golf, she says, because all the men in her organization played golf: “How could I be in the room if I am not doing the same things as others?”

Although she took this initiative upon herself, leaders who care about diversity can – and should – reach out to bring people who don’t look like them into activities during work hours and other social work-related outings.

By the same token, Black leaders must reach out to others who look like them as well. “I have never had a mentor/sponsor who looked like me,” says Pegues.

“As simple as it sounds, engage in recruiting,” says Nchege. When his employer wants to hire, Nchege shares the job post with his network to increase the chance of recruiting a diverse pool of candidates. Be purposeful and intentional about engagement that opens up opportunities for the Black community, the panelists advise.

Be purposeful and intentional about engagement that opens up opportunities for the Black community.

Pegues takes his CIO role seriously when it comes to driving community impact and engagement. For example, Aurora STEAM Academy – a partnership between the City of Aurora’s IT Department and Youth Services Division, APS Training Academy, and TinkRworks – offers a unique free learning opportunity for Aurora students to explore the interconnections of science, technology, engineering, arts, and math in a co-curricular after-school environment. Subsidized by the City of Aurora, Aurora STEAM Academy strives to empower students and close the digital divide. The program started with 50 kids in 2021, expanded to 750 in 2022, and in 2023 aims to serve up to 1600 disenfranchised kids from low- to moderate-income families.

3. Training matters

It benefits everyone to think about what they can do to increase diversity within their company, Nchege says. And to that end, training on the positive impact of diversity matters.

Ten percent of all Black students attend a historically black college or university (HBCU), and 20 percent of all Black graduating students attend an HBCU. Students coming out of these schools have some of the brightest minds in our midst. What if your company had a program to recruit and/or mentor these graduates? The benefits would be double-sided.

Hannah cites a McKinsey study about how organizations with women leaders improve things for all employees. Keep this in mind when considering who to promote within your organization.

Training is not just about the do’s, it’s also about the don’ts. For example, disarming micro-aggressions is an important way to “train” the biased mindset. Stopping or deflecting potentially hurtful comments or actions by expressing disagreement, challenging what is said or done, and/or pointing out its harmful impact can all help to shift attitudes.

A seat at the table

Several years ago, Nchege and his leadership team were meeting with a vendor. Throughout the meeting, the vendor consistently addressed one of the white male managers on Nchege’s team, who happened to be sitting at the head of the table. That manager tried shifting his gaze to Nchege to imply that he was the decision-maker, but the vendor continued to address the manager, even asking him if they could seal the deal. The manager responded by looking at Nchege and saying, “You should ask him.”

Nchege asked the team to leave the room and told the vendor directly that he had made an assumption and that based on this behavior, there would be no deal.

[ Read also: 4 reasons diverse engineering teams drive innovation ]

On the topic of unconscious bias, Hannah points out that the loudest person in the room is usually perceived as the most knowledgeable and the one who is driving change. But often, she says, the real change-makers are the quiet people who listen. It is important not to underestimate or make assumptions about people when you first meet them.

Pegues, on the other hand, takes a different approach: He always sits at the head of the table when he is in charge, leaving no ambiguity!

Change must start at the highest level, Pegues says. Without leadership support, it does not stand a chance. Your team members must be courageous enough to stand up and express themselves, so make sure that they feel free to do so. Changes happen top-down and bottom-up: If you say you are going to focus on diversity, mean it.

Mantras for meaningful change

On the issue of diversity in technology, there is hope for positive change – but hope by itself does not make things happen. Actions do. And to that end, Pegues says, “Change starts with you.”

  • Black leadership can bring value – if we let it in.
  • Advocacy in the room can be a catalyst – if we increase our awareness.
  • Safe spaces help – if we have the courage to speak up.

Consider these your mantras for creating meaningful change in the culture of your IT organization.

[ Learn how CIOs are speeding toward goals while preventing employee burnout in this report from Harvard Business Review Analytic Services: Maintaining Momentum on Digital Transformation.]

The tech industry remains notoriously lacking in diversity. Three IT leaders from different industries discuss how to make change happen from the inside
marjorie_freeman_diversity_faces
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Digital transformation: Maximize customer experience in 3 steps
Posted on Monday June 20, 2022

Digital transformation: Maximize customer experience in 3 steps Michael Ramsey June 20, 2022 - 3:00am

Organizations looking to improve the customer service experience have long turned to digital solutions – to great effect if done correctly. According to McKinsey, organizations that successfully leverage digital products to improve the customer experience are able to increase customer satisfaction by up to 20 percent, reduce the cost to serve by up to 40 percent, and boost conversion rates and growth by 20 percent.

However, to truly impact and improve the customer experience, organizations need to go beyond simply purchasing a product. Research from Boston Consulting Group shows that 70 percent of digital transformation efforts fail, often for reasons that have more to do with implementation than with the actual solutions themselves.

3 ways to prioritize customer experience during digital transformation

Below are three simple steps that IT and customer service leaders should take to make sure their digital transformation investment drives positive experiences for agents and customers.

1. Involve the customer service team early and often

Because agents interact with customers directly, they have a unique and clear perspective on the overall customer experience and how digital solutions can help or hinder processes.

[ Also read How to manage disruption during digital transformation. ]

Customer service leaders should give their teams – including everyone who performs work on behalf of the customer, from service agents to middle and back-office operations like fulfillment and billing – a chance to weigh in on what they need to do their job most efficiently.

Once implemented, providing training and ongoing enablement is essential. There will be a learning curve with any new technology. And it can be particularly tricky for customer service teams, who need to learn and adopt new technologies and processes that impact every corner of the organization while continuing to resolve customer requests. Affording appropriate time and training to learn the tech is a crucial step that you can’t afford to skip if you want your digital transformation to work.

Finally, provide a vehicle for continuous feedback and maintain an open line of communication with the teams using the new technology to understand how it’s working. Building a process to solicit feedback from both employees and customers is crucial to making sure that any challenges or difficulties with the implementation are addressed quickly and can be maintained over time.

2. Measure what matters most

One of the most common reasons digital transformation efforts in customer service fail is a misalignment between the technology investment and an organization’s goals and objectives. If you want your digital transformation to truly improve the customer experience, think beyond improving operational processes and focus on the factors that make a real, tangible impact on the customer and the business. At the end of the day, digital transformation should create frictionless customer and agent experiences.

One of the most common reasons digital transformation efforts in customer service fail is a misalignment between the technology investment and an organization's goals and objectives.

Success metrics must also evolve from operational to outcome-based: Has a customer made a purchase or upgrade following the customer service interaction? Did they refer new customers? Has their usage increased? These metrics focus on outcomes and tie to business objectives. It’s important to look at the overall customer experience with the products and services, not just at the customer service interaction, and to understand how that experience drives business outcomes.

[ Read next: How to measure customer experience: 3 tips ]

3. Prioritize change management

Solving a customer issue or complaint often involves more than one team and goes beyond customer service agents – from finance and fulfillment to marketing and product. If digital transformation investments change how the customer service team works, it often means there will be a ripple effect throughout the entire organization.

All teams involved in solving a customer request should have a clear understanding of how digital transformation initiatives will impact their work. Take the time to clearly communicate the new technology implementations, driving home how and why it will help the business. If you don’t manage change effectively, you risk internal roadblocks, either via intentional resistance or confusion about the purpose or particulars of new processes. This can prevent organizations from extracting the true value from digital transformation efforts.

Ultimately, digital transformation is key to success for any customer service team in 2022 and beyond. Customers expect fast and proactive service at their fingertips, at any time, and on any device. Digital transformation is the key to meeting these expectations.

If you are intentional about involving all of the teams that touch customer service, evaluating progress in a way that’s consistent with organizational goals, and deftly managing workflow shifts throughout the organization, digital transformation will open the door to a new era of connected customer experiences that build customer relationships and drive customer loyalty.

[ Discover how priorities are changing. Get the Harvard Business Review Analytic Services report: Maintaining momentum on digital transformation. ]

Want to ensure that your transformation initiative is a win for both employees and customers? Consider these expert tips
Man and woman run up stairs holding blue arrow going up. digital transformation
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Q&A: 3 digital transformation questions and answers about boosting team productivity
Posted on Thursday June 16, 2022

Q&A: 3 digital transformation questions and answers about boosting team productivity Stanley Huang June 16, 2022 - 3:00am

Even after two years of rapid technology adoption, it’s rare to find a company that has a clear and accurate understanding of how each individual employee uses technology at work – and what they need from those tools. 

In this interview, Stanley Huang, Moxo's Chief Technology Officer, shares what organizations need to focus on in the years to come. He offers tips for CIOs and CTOs to help unburden employees and increase productivity through technology in the workplace.

1. Digital transformation can lead to fragmentation. Why is this a problem for employees?

In most industries, customer preferences have become digital-first – especially in the last two years.

To meet this demand, IT teams and leaders have driven digital transition initiatives with urgency, automating processes and moving services to the cloud. Their efforts have often resulted in an excess of digital tools, leaving both teams and business processes fragmented, or operating from disparate channels that lack cohesion.

Now, as companies continue to adjust their business models to accommodate digital-first customers, they must fine-tune their digital transformation strategies to better meet the needs of their workforce and alleviate common pain points throughout day-to-day operations.

Fragmented processes impact both business productivity and company culture by straining communication and creating bottlenecks at key points in business workflows. To ensure maximum productivity, digital transformation must be consistent, especially for remote teams.

[ Also read Digital transformation: 5 reality checks before you take the plunge. ]

The internal effectiveness of employees relies heavily on the technologies deployed. To streamline workflow, bring structure to processes that typically require multiple hand-offs at different junctions in a project lifecycle.

On the culture side, fragmented processes weaken connectivity and drive a wedge between C-suite executives and junior-level employees. To avoid this, adopt technology that closes this gap and unites the workforce in one digital channel.

A recent Gartner survey on the future of work found that executives are better equipped to work remotely than employees. 

Convey to your employees who you are as an organization and the value you bring, just as you do to your customers.

If your company’s decision-makers and its employees have fundamentally different remote work experiences, the employee experience is likely to be strained as this new model becomes more permanent.

The main takeaway: Convey to your employees who you are as an organization and the value you bring, just as you do to your customers. Remember, your employee is your customer.

2. How can IT leaders implement digital transformation in a way that does not burden employees and hamper productivity?

The best way to approach digital transformation is to think from the outside in but operate from the inside out.

Begin by simply understanding your customers’ needs. Then execute from a position that aligns with your employees’ needs and helps them create value from an internal perspective. To focus solely on the customer is to put the cart before the horse. Remember, your employee is your customer, and digital transformation efforts, when executed properly, always lead to a positive customer experience.

Your employee is your customer, and digital transformation efforts, when executed properly, always lead to a positive customer experience.

To unburden your employees, do away with outdated legacy systems that create bottlenecks and force employees to operate from disjointed channels. Instead, opt for technology that provides a centralized experience and reduces the number of touchpoints for employees to complete tasks and access information. This will instantly speed up the flow of communication throughout the organization and allow teams to operate more efficiently.

As the needs of the internal team change, dynamically adjust your plan to create a future-proof strategy that continually accommodates your employees’ needs and optimizes business processes.

3. Digital transformation is usually geared toward the customer and improving their overall experience. Why is it important to also focus on the employee experience?

Think from the outside-in perspective: We all check our bank accounts, stream movies, book vacations, and more with the click of a button. These services are difficult to deliver but simple to receive. In our personal lives, we have become accustomed to just-in-time, seamless interactions.

But when we step into the workplace, we often experience something different. Whether these challenges include difficulty connecting with upper management, getting clear, prompt answers to important questions, or jumping through multiple hoops to complete a simple task, the employee experience hasn’t lived up to the intuitive and seamless interactions we all enjoy as customers.

Digital transformation comes into the equation because the tools and various technologies organizations use help shape employee perceptions. In the digital-first world, technology is the enabler of all business transactions, and it should serve all stakeholders, internal and external.

As the war on talent wages on, an enhanced focus on employee experience will be paramount to remaining competitive and retaining top talent. Start by approaching your employees from their point of view, and make time –through town halls, surveys, one-on-one meetings, or other venues – to understand their wants, needs, fears, and anxieties.

[ Read also: Using automation to improve employee experience ]

In addition, make training and skills development a part of the overall culture throughout your digital transformation strategy. Employees want to feel that organizations are investing in them and to see empathy from leaders – through words and actions.

In 2022 and beyond, the employee experience will be increasingly critical to conducting business in a digital-first world and in an economy that has become deeply rooted in experience.

[ Leading CIOs are reimagining the nature of work while strengthening organizational resilience. Learn 4 key digital transformation leadership priorities in a new report from Harvard Business Review Analytic Services. ]

As customer demand drives digital transformation, remember that your employees are also your customers. Consider this expert advice to keep them engaged and productive
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Using automation to improve employee experience
Posted on Wednesday June 15, 2022

Using automation to improve employee experience Dave Egts June 15, 2022 - 3:00am

Successful digital transformation hinges on the continuous improvement of people, processes, and technologies. We often treat these three components as independent silos: We’ll mutually exclusively upgrade our technologies, enhance our processes, or improve the work lives of our people.

These are all important and necessary, but what if we linked all three together? What if we could automate our processes to integrate our technologies to enhance the efficiency and satisfaction of our people?

Let me give you an easy example of how we’re doing this at Red Hat.

We all know how the Great Resignation, physical isolation from coworkers, and return-to-office anxieties contribute to what many call the Great Reprioritization. Employees want to make a difference and a visible impact and are re-evaluating their place in the organization and looking for meaning and purpose in their work.

[ Read also: IT talent and the Great Resignation: 8 ways to nurture retention ]

One of the downsides of remote work is that the visibility of their impact often goes unrecognized by their leadership and peers. Even if they are recognized, the recognition may be widely unnoticed, unlike in an office scenario full of coworkers.

Further, leaders express gratitude less often than they should, as noted in a recent HBR study. Higher-level people in organizations express less gratitude because they feel more entitled to favors and benefits based on their elevated standing in the hierarchy.

I’d argue that two additional factors come into play to make the expression of gratitude less frequent: busy-ness and friction. Everyone’s moving very fast given the accelerated operational tempo of the world we now live in, and sometimes expressing gratitude gets relegated to the “later” pile, which may never happen. Also, formal rewards programs may have just enough friction that the intent to express gratitude falls by the wayside and doesn’t even make it to the “later” pile.

Given this problem, how can automation and integration make the expression of gratitude friction-free and highly visible?

[Also read How automation strategy can help you retain IT talent. ]

At Red Hat, we do that with Kudos Bot. Kudos Bot is an internally developed bot that integrates with our chat platform. Reminiscent of karma IRC bots, employees can express gratitude on our chat system by simply @-mentioning the gratitude recipient, @-mentioning Kudos Bot, and adding a brief message of appreciation.

The possibilities to improve the employee experience through automation and integration are endless.

Like IRC bots, Kudos Bot notifies the recipient and publicly increments their karma points. But unlike traditional IRC bots that simply tally karma points, Kudos Bot integrates with our employee rewards system, Reward Zone. Kudos Bot notifies Reward Zone of the expression of gratitude. Reward Zone then emails the recipient, and optionally the recipient’s manager, a printable certificate of appreciation with the sender’s name and message of appreciation. The manager can also use Reward Zone to report how much gratitude each employee has received to help justify raises and promotions.

Anyone at Red Hat can use Kudos Bot to express gratitude to any other employee, no matter where they are in the hierarchy. Employees can express appreciation privately or publicly in a room for all to see. Kudos Bot makes expressing gratitude as easy as possible, enabling leaders to acknowledge employees effortlessly, regularly, and publicly.

[ Read also: Hybrid work: 5 tips for prioritizing the employee experience ]

Kudos Bot is a straightforward example of how Red Hat automates our processes to integrate our technologies and enhances the satisfaction of our people. Specifically, integrating our chat system with our reward system helps leaders and peers quickly and formally express gratitude and provides an objective measure of accomplishments to identify and retain key talent.

The possibilities to improve the employee experience through automation and integration are endless. If you want to pilot something in your organization, poll your employees about what would be the most impactful. Where are they seeing sludge that drags down morale and slows business velocity? You and your IT team can plot each idea on an impact and effort prioritization matrix.

Some suggestions may be easier to implement than you think, as many cloud services are already API-enabled, making automation straightforward. Once your team implements an initial valuable and visible integration, more employee lightbulbs will go off, identifying additional ideas for automation and integration for your prioritization backlog.

And don’t forget about the ROI calculators in your automation tooling, as they will help objectively refine your prioritization by analyzing your planned and actual savings. Not only will your employees benefit directly from the automation, but they will also feel heard when they see their ideas come to life.

[ How can automation free up more staff time for innovation? Get the free eBook: Managing IT with Automation. ]

Remote and hybrid work can make it harder to express gratitude and recognize individual achievements. Consider this example of how Red Hat is using automation to do just that
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How to manage disruption during digital transformation
Posted on Tuesday June 14, 2022

How to manage disruption during digital transformation Arun ‘Rak’ Ram… June 14, 2022 - 3:00am

If you go into a digital transformation initiative unprepared to manage change, you may well face a mutiny. Digital transformation may sound exciting, but it inevitably involves considerable disruption for individuals as well as the entire organization. Affected team members often feel a loss of control and connectedness.

Your goal as an IT leader should be not only to avoid backlash but to turn the change into an opportunity to deepen engagement among those affected. It is critical that teams gain more control as part of the transformation. Transformation should not happen to them; rather, team members should help make transformation happen.

Individuals need to have a say on changes, whether these involve new architectures and models, new algorithms, or decision-making and supervisory processes. Team members should be significant contributors to your final digital transformation.

[ Also read Digital transformation: 5 reality checks before you take the plunge. ]

Roles will change, creating new opportunities for employees and the organization. For example, if an algorithm will replace an employee to approve loans or make decisions based on data, could that employee then become a supervisor who oversees these decisions?

Also, digital transformation, by definition, creates more virtual settings, meetings, decisions, and environments. This augmented reality can make it more difficult for people to communicate and feel empowered and connected to the company.

3 tips for dealing with disruption during digital transformation

Here are three points to help your teams manage disruption during digital transformation.

1. Communicate

The most challenging task is to prepare your team for change and help them embrace it. Communicating and clarifying up front exactly what will change and which roles will be impacted is critical.

Communicating once is not enough. During digital transformation, change is all-encompassing and constant. Think of your team members as consumers and apply the Rule of Seven, which states that people need to hear or see a message seven times before they will act.

Use email, video calls, small team meetings, and in-person interactive sessions to make sure all team members understand and are engaged.

Also keep in mind that every individual has a preferred learning method. In addition to communicating your message multiple times, use email, video calls, small team meetings, and in-person interactive sessions to make sure all team members understand and are engaged.

2. Create connections

Fostering a renewed sense of community creates new connections for existing teams and cross-functional teams. Encourage collaboration and offer a holistic view of a release’s full lifecycle, from design and development to operations, testing, and launch. Assign product managers and business owners so team members understand how their work connects to the broader digital transformation.

[ Read also: Cloud strategy: What CIOs really want from cloud providers ]

Further, consider integrated platform teams to manage cloud migration or cloud transformation. That way, as workloads and decisions move to the cloud, employees can be part of an integrated team using the cloud platform across different business functions. This will help give teams and team members a sense of connectedness.

Effective communication will enable your organization to identify where skill upgrades are needed and to ensure that talent gaps are filled with the right people. Employees who use this opportunity to upgrade their skills will help drive the organization to the next level.

3. Control

The most essential component of digital transformation is people, not technology. Empower your team members with control in your digital transformation. Enable and encourage them to learn new skills.

Digital transformation cannot happen without disruption. But disruption builds stronger, more resilient teams when people are empowered in the new world they helped create.

[ Discover how priorities are changing. Get the Harvard Business Review Analytic Services report: Maintaining momentum on digital transformation. ]

Digital transformation involves change, and change is disruptive. Consider these three concepts to help your teams adjust
signs of a great digital transformation leader
Article

I cant explain the feeling of getting scammed of your hard earned money and savings by some random people, that feeling of being worthless and just being one of the many random people who was foolish enough to give out your hard earned money to strangers without proper investigation. Well it is not always as simple as it looks, most of us still got seriously scammed not because we are dumb or foolish but because we met the wrong people at the wrong time, or we simply got unlucky.
i got severely wrecked after an investment scam i fell to in 2020 during covid. few weeks later i had covid and two months later i was almost homeless, my entire world was crumbling right before my eyes until i met this group of Hackers, they helped me recover my funds and worked on my credit, suggested legit investment companies for me, and today i am buying my 2nd house, i cant help but give them a review wherever i can today. they saved my life. if you have same situation, please dont hesitate to reach them
website: https://albarshazom.wixsite.com/blockwiz
Email: blockchain@cyber-wizard.com
Tel: +1 (352) 443-8803 (whatsapp only)


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Digital transformation: 3 ways it changes companies
Posted on Thursday June 09, 2022

Digital transformation: 3 ways it changes companies Anthony Macciola June 9, 2022 - 3:00am

I’ve worked on intelligent automation projects with many organizations worldwide, and there is no doubt: The digital transformation process has a huge impact – not only by bringing about obvious initial change but also by affecting business leaders’ outlook for the future.

One common result is they want more, expect more, and invest more. Here’s why.

1. They are more stringent about ROI before investing again

When Robotic Process Automation (RPA) entered the market, there was a rush to go digital and not miss the “automation train.” Using software robots was the buzz. Anything that was manually intensive had RPA thrown at it, but it didn’t always stick.

Fast-forward a couple of years and companies found that as many as 50 percent of their RPA projects failed. This happened because leaders got caught up in the latest new tech hype instead of looking at their specific problem and how to solve it.

[Also read Digital transformation: 3 ways a culture of innovation can drive your strategy. ]

You don’t always need the most complex or expensive technology to address your business challenges – you need to apply the right solution to it. It’s how the tech is delivered, maintained, supported, and secured that brings true ROI. Companies that are fully committed to digital transformation (DX) are well aware of this, and they start out with a clear focus on getting their money’s worth.

Automaton teams are now doing more due diligence before investing in DX, and that often means a full-scale 360 analysis of their operations, procedures, and processes – including every click of a keyboard. This is the only way to determine the best task or process that will benefit from automation and thus uncover the highest ROI.

Previously, companies would often select a task that occurred most frequently and ignore opportunities to automate tasks that occurred less frequently but would offer better ROI. Finance departments, which are notoriously paper-intensive, are a common starting point.

We worked with a global logistics company, for example, that realized the automation of their accounts processing wasn’t delivering the efficiencies they expected. A full analysis led to upgrades using artificial intelligence, machine learning, and natural language processing, resulting in a 70 percent increase in efficiency. Highly automated AP departments like this can process ten times as many invoices per month compared to finance operations with little or no automation. This is the sort of ROI that companies should be aiming for: It reflects the difference between going digital and full digital transformation.

2. They invest more in people and tech jointly

The number-one reason new tech fails is simple: People don’t like it, so they don’t use it. Even the most sophisticated, expensive apps have been abandoned when consumers don’t take to them – because there were too many clicks, for example, repetitive requests for info, or a complex screen.

The same occurs in the business world. Your employees must be fully on board with the new way of working, and you must be ready to train them and invest in their digital skills, along with utilizing no-code solutions that are as easy as plug-and-play.

Most of the companies I’ve taken through successful digital transformations ensured that employees at all levels were involved in discussions about the new tech and processes they’d be using. In fact, many had established a Center of Excellence to ensure key stakeholders were consulted, involved, and fully invested in the success of the deployment.

And employees may need more than just tech training. Now that bots are doing tedious tasks, workers need the skills to understand the content and context of the data they are automating.

[ Read also: 3 reasons user experience matters to your digital transformation strategy ]

Additionally, frontline workers must be more creative, critical, agile, empathetic, and knowledgeable problem-solvers. It’s now about building a partnership between a robust digital workforce and human counterparts who can add to the offering. Business leaders understand that the future of work involves human-robot collaboration to meet or exceed business goals and accelerate transformation.

3. They are more obsessed with improving customer experience

Research shows that the corporate goal of most automation projects is to improve productivity and profitability. However, those who’ve taken the plunge realize that the benefit to the customer experience is also a major priority for change. Balancing the competing interests of cutting costs and delighting customers is tricky, and much is being pinned on new technologies.

Customers are getting savvier and their expectations are growing: 43 percent of consumers blacklist brands that fail to meet their expectations, according to a recent study conducted by Oracle and Customer Bliss. More importantly, the study pointed out that 41 percent of consumers are willing to pay a 20 percent premium for a “more impressive customer experience.”

That means every part of the automation project will likely impact the customer. It could mean their queries are answered more accurately, replies are made sooner, or they are paid on time or receive delivery faster. Our recent survey among office workers revealed that difficulty finding data in a document led to poor customer experience (20 percent) and errors (31 percent). It shows just how much a bad process can have a negative domino effect.

[ Read next: 5 ways digital transformation drives customer success ]

The impact of technology for both gaining and retaining customers is truly invaluable to the bottom line.

Clearly, organizations that have undergone digital transformation don’t have tunnel vision and the process opens their minds to how it can improve overall business success. Most importantly, companies that embrace a digital transformation mindset know that it’s an endless journey, not a one-and-done job. Digital transformation is a process of continuous growth.

[ Discover how priorities are changing. Get the Harvard Business Review Analytic Services report: Maintaining momentum on digital transformation. ]

Companies that embrace a digital transformation mindset focus not on technology, but on how it can improve overall business success. Consider these examples
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3 ways to foster team connections in a hybrid workplace
Posted on Wednesday June 08, 2022

3 ways to foster team connections in a hybrid workplace Leon Gilbert June 8, 2022 - 3:00am

In the past two and a half years, we’ve seen that remote work is not only possible but that it has become core to any organization’s employee experience. From an IT perspective, teams worked to quickly give employees the tools they needed to collaborate and meet deadlines – all while ensuring that with employees distributed, remote work did not increase security risks.

IT did not do this in a silo. At many firms, IT worked with HR to force organizational change management at breakneck speeds. What comes next, as teams return to hybrid or fully remote workplaces, might be the hardest part.

The practices adopted during the pandemic became in many ways the industry standard and changing our collective muscle memories may prove difficult. For younger workers who have spent their entire career at home, remote work is the only way. Meanwhile, more senior employees have become acclimated to the new lifestyle and may hesitate to return to the office.

[ Related read: Hybrid work: 4 ways to strengthen teams and boost productivity. ]

In partnering with HR, one of the most pressing challenges IT can solve is defining the employee experience and making it universal across locations. Pre-pandemic, the needs of remote workers often got little attention. The past two years, however, created parity: From video calls to cloud storage and collaboration, the reliance on shared tools fostered equity and a connection that could now be challenged with a hybrid workforce.

For companies that are asking employees to return to the office, IT needs to bring the in-office experience up to par with working from home. This involves both the science of creating the systems and infrastructure to support these relationships and the art of ensuring employees are using them.

1. Partner with HR to personalize onboarding

One critical way to enrich the employee experience is to ensure that employees feel supported by their organization. Firms have cycled through employees whose tenure has begun and ended during the pandemic without ever stepping into a physical office. HR and IT can work together to create an organizational culture of support.

The organizational connectivity begins at onboarding with both HR and IT. Too often, hardware is sent to employees with limited guidance and complicated instructions, creating a poor onboarding experience. This early negative experience can cause delayed employee productivity and early aggravation. Personalizing setup with IT-led video calls and a step-by-step checklist for employee onboarding is key.

While ticketing systems and similar processes are essential for most large enterprise IT operations, properly explaining the systems empowers employees to understand and utilize them, which raises the efficiency of IT across the organization.

[ Read next: Hybrid work: 5 tips for prioritizing the employee experience ]

2. Use AI for employee well-being

The Great Resignation has forced enterprise leadership teams to change their behaviors in order to retain employees. Beyond the human element of providing long-term options for remote work and permanent accommodations, IT can implement systems that encourage employees to prioritize their mental health and wellness.

IT can humanize the employee experience by leveraging AI and chatbots on intranet sites, providing calls to action to learn about mental health and available benefits, for example, or viewing data on how much time employees spend on emails and calls after hours to better understand overall work strain.

By delivering this data to HR, IT can help HR improve employee affinity, which in turn strengthens long-term connectivity between employees and the firm.

[ Read next: Building a learning culture with AI ]

Developing tools that empower employees to learn about one another forges relationships between teams.

3. Foster workforce connections

To further foster human connections, developing tools that empower employees to learn about one another forges relationships between teams. Firms that incorporate tools such as Zoom or Microsoft Teams to digitize the employee experience should also invest to ensure that employees are actually using them.

Gamification of these tools to drive near- and long-term adoption is key. Rewarding and highlighting employee actions across these platforms creates a shared employee connection regardless of where employees are located. Incentivizing adoption and ultimately seeing which tools stick helps leaders build camaraderie.

[ Don’t try to recreate what was normal before the pandemic. Learn from leading CIOs in a new report from Harvard Business Review Analytic Services: Maintaining Momentum on Digital Transformation. ]

Successful digital transformation requires successful change management

Implementing the best technology in the world will not guarantee employee productivity. This requires effective change management efforts that ensure employees adopt and are able to proficiently use new tools and approaches in their work environment.

Start by getting to know your workforce. Some employees are eager adopters; others may resist new technologies. Some employees can easily figure out how to use new technologies, others require more training and support. Understanding these different employee personas will help your IT and HR teams work together to implement strategies that encourage tech adoption.

As the hybrid workplace becomes the industry standard for knowledge workers, creating an environment that facilitates human connections will take on increased importance. The partnership between HR and IT is critical and I look forward to seeing it continuously drive the employee experience in the digital workplace.

[ Want more advice on leading hybrid work? Read What is a hybrid work model? and Hybrid work model: 5 advantages. ]

All employees should feel supported in a hybrid workplace. Here’s how IT and HR can work together to strengthen team relationships
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How digital transformation is changing the IT hiring game
Posted on Tuesday June 07, 2022

How digital transformation is changing the IT hiring game Eric Lefebvre June 7, 2022 - 3:00am

Colleagues and job seekers often ask me, as a CIO, what I’m looking for when it comes to hiring. I tell them, “I’m looking for ranchers, not pet owners.”

My response, while blunt, speaks to the changing nature of IT and how digitization and worldwide governmental mandates are changing how we approach our roles. We no longer have the time nor the resources for one-time unique “pet” projects without repeatability or reuse components. We need solutions that are template-based, repeatable, and easily scalable to meet rapidly changing business conditions.

My advice to peers and colleagues is to hire candidates with the skill sets to focus on economies of scale. Interchangeable solutions that can be replicated to meet whatever level of service your business demands are essential.

[ Also read Digital transformation: 3 ways a culture of innovation can drive your strategy. ]

IT leaders should also be looking for professionals who are focused on automation and developing business processes in the cloud that can be easily turned on and off as business demands rise and fall. This creates seamless maintenance, increased performance, and cost certainty for organizations looking to effectively manage IT budgets.

Where is the focus?

Business operations and IT must be in lockstep to be successful in a modern digital economy. Disjointed priorities and poor communication can quickly lead to failure. To execute any global strategy effectively, a business needs IT and IT needs to know what the business is doing to plan accordingly.

As an IT leader, you must understand some basic business principles and ensure that your team members also understand these concepts and can successfully execute programs that lead to successful outcomes.

Here are three that should top the list:

Revenue management: Understanding business system integration and how revenue will be reported around the world is critical. The value and reputation of your company depend on getting this right.

Data is a company's most valuable asset. Understanding it and protecting it is IT's highest priority.

Capabilities assessment: What is the maturity of your systems as it relates to scalability, security, disaster recovery, continuity, and more? What are your software development cycles and DevOps processes? Where are the gaps?

Data management: How is your data being managed? Who has access to the data? How do changes in process impact the validity of your data on a global basis? Data is a company’s most valuable asset. Understanding it and protecting it is IT’s highest priority.

The digitization factor

Why is all of this important? For the first time ever, business is behind the government when it comes to technology implementation. To a degree, we have always counted on government entities to be laggards and not capable of dictating terms and timelines to business. Those days are over. All across the world, new standards and mandates are being implemented and enforcement is stronger than it’s ever been.

Government entities are now requiring real-time or near real-time data. This is causing companies to pivot and adopt a centralized approach to their data, systems, business processes, and applications. Failure to centralize will lead to lower quality because every country requires data to be formatted uniquely.

This is unacceptable for most companies, which puts additional pressure on IT to quickly comprehend new mandates and regulations and manage them effectively. Doing this takes talent.

The world is changing quickly. Businesses are more reliant than ever on IT, creating internal stress. Meanwhile, governments around the world are investing in their own digital transformation, creating external sources of pressure. To meet this changing dynamic, IT leaders need to have the vision to strategize and the foresight to hire people who can consistently execute.

Hire ranchers, not pet owners. You’ll be glad you did.

[ Discover how priorities are changing. Get the Harvard Business Review Analytic Services report: Maintaining momentum on digital transformation. ]

Today’s fast-evolving digital economy calls for scalable solutions to complex business demands. Look for candidates with the skills to execute accordingly
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Digital transformation: How to gain organizational buy-in
Posted on Monday June 06, 2022

Digital transformation: How to gain organizational buy-in Chelsea Barnes June 6, 2022 - 3:00am

Three-quarters of digital transformation initiatives are stuck in “pilot purgatory.” Why are so many projects unable to scale their digital systems at an enterprise level?

While technical boxes may be checked, organizational adoption – if and how employees welcome the change – is often ignored. Achieving genuine buy-in from people is a much more complex challenge than installing hardware or software. Go figure.

[ Also read Digital transformation: 5 reality checks before you take the plunge. ]

From our experience, there are four common hold-ups when it comes to organizational adoption. As an IT leader, ask yourself these questions:

  • How are you making it easier for your employees to visualize a new “day-to-day” and make them comfortable with those changes without fear of job insecurity?
  • In what ways are you reinforcing and reskilling your existing talent so that data competency is pervasive across your organization?
  • Where can you revise your organizational structure to encourage collaboration rather than competing priorities that slow down the project?
  • What processes can you institute (or improve) that will enable a faster pace of change so that your company can learn continuously and organically?

Changing roles and job security

Most people do not willingly accept change, especially when it comes to job disruption. Recent research regarding job security and automation trends shows that about a quarter of people are fearful that “AI will take their job.”

Leverage those who will be most impacted to shape the future of the organization, building change champions and advocates along the way.

This percentage is lower than it was a few years ago, thanks to a better understanding of the human role in the workplace of the future, but it still calls on CIOs and IT leaders to thoughtfully consider how they will convey changes to valued employees.

Consider the employee who typically spends many hours a week collecting data and building reports. Their natural responses to a new digital tool will almost definitely be fear of reduced job security if their concerns are not addressed directly. For such employees to adopt modern technology, there must be an incentive.

For starters, as systems are connected and processes are digitized, many information-based tasks that were once done manually, such as data collection and reporting, become automated. This frees up their time to focus on more strategic, meaningful, and high-level tasks. It’s not a matter of replacement but evolution. The role of the employee will change from doing repetitive tasks to more analytical and problem-solving work.

[ Read also: Automation vs. IT jobs: 3 ways leaders can address layoff fears ]

Defining these new roles does not need to be a strictly top-down decision. Implement a proactive change management strategy to engage all impacted employees early in the process. Incorporate employee feedback in the solution and organizational design process, leveraging those who will be most impacted to shape the future of the organization, building change champions and advocates along the way.

Rethinking the approach to talent needs

Data analytics does not always require data scientists. CIOs and IT leaders often reach a turning point when they discover that most employees can be trained to become resident data analytics subject experts. When employees combine new knowledge of data analysis with their existing knowledge of the processes or machines, they can quickly be at the forefront of a digital journey.

When employees combine new knowledge of data analysis with their existing knowledge of the processes or machines, they can quickly be at the forefront of a digital journey.

This is welcome news to most IT leaders, simply because the demand for skillsets in data science and cybersecurity has skyrocketed. Upskilling existing team members can be critical in attaining sustained adoption and continuous improvements of digital solutions. This includes long-term improvements in employee engagement and retention, increased cross-functional collaboration, and adoption of modern technology trends.

Along with their technical skills, employees need to be skilled at diagnostics and problem-solving using the data now readily available to them. Employees who may have previously been data-gatherers can shift to become problem-solvers based on new data-driven insights. Make sure your employees are ready to learn and grow to take advantage of these opportunities.

Effective collaboration among IT and operations teams

When two forces within an organization are unwilling to work together, it can create immense friction. In the case of digital transformation, the priorities of IT and operational technology (OT) are often competing and unaligned.

For instance, in a manufacturing setting, OT and operations teams focus on improving the productivity of the plant (i.e., making more product for less cost). On the other hand, IT typically focuses on sustaining enterprise platforms and mitigating cyber risk.

Competing priorities can also result from how projects are funded. OT teams are often focused on solving problems in one plant and sometimes even incentivized to compete against other plants within the same supply chain network. IT teams may be more interested in a scalable solution that benefits all plants but are not able to fully fund a project.

When these two priorities are exclusive, it limits collaboration and delays the digital transformation process. However, adoption depends on effective collaboration between IT and OT teams: OT teams bring the manufacturing process expertise and knowledge of where the data is born. IT teams ensure that the enterprise platforms and requisite network infrastructure are reliable, scalable, and secure.

To align the objectives of both IT and OT teams, consider formalizing initiative teams dedicated to digital transformation with leads and subject matter experts from both IT and OT functions. These cross-functional teams, funded jointly between operations, engineering, and IT, can collectively define initiative objectives, collaborate on implementation plans, and be the change champions across the organization. They should have a common group of executive stakeholders, read out progress together, and be rewarded together.

Enabling a faster pace for learning and experimentation

To stay competitive in today’s digital world, organizations must stay up to speed on digital initiatives. They must extract lessons quickly and apply those learnings to implement new functionality. Creating a culture that fosters continuous growth and learning opportunities is not only critical to the successful adoption of digital tools but to continuous improvement of digital technologies through experimentation.

Core attributes of “learning organizations,” a concept popularized by Peter Senge, include systematic problem-solving, experimentation, and knowledge transfer. Systematic problem-solving incorporates generating a hypothesis, testing that hypothesis, and using data as opposed to assumptions as the basis for decision-making. A minimum viable product (MVP) approach can be used to quickly test a hypothesis and generate data to evaluate the solution’s efficacy. Using a common enterprise platform can enable you to scale an MVP across the enterprise quickly.

Digital transformation requires a change in thinking – about the way we address employees’ concerns, their desire to learn and gain new skills, their ability to make higher-level decisions, and their keenness to experiment and problem solve. But too often, organizations are trapped in a box. They overlook the critical link between having the right technology and achieving a step-change in operational productivity. When IT leaders ask people-centered questions, they can get to the heart of why their digital transformation initiatives are stuck and make necessary changes to move those efforts along.

[ Discover how priorities are changing. Get the Harvard Business Review Analytic Services report: Maintaining momentum on digital transformation. ]

Successful digital transformation requires adoption across your organization. Consider these ‘people-focused’ strategies to address issues that can slow your progress
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