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New danger for corals in warming oceans: Metal pollution
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Metal copper from agricultural runoff and marine paint leaching from boat hulls poses an emerging threat to soft coral sea fans in the waters around Puerto Rico.

Endangered whales react to environmental changes
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Some 'canaries' are 50 feet long, weigh 70 tons, and are nowhere near a coal mine. But the highly endangered North Atlantic right whale is sending the same kind of message about disruptive change in the environment by rapidly altering its use of important habitat areas off the New England coast.

Technique identifies T cells primed for certain allergies or infections
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Researchers can now identify T cells reactive to a particular target from a patient's cells, and to perform high-throughput single-cell RNA sequencing of those cells.

Chronic opioid therapy can disrupt sleep, increase risk of sleep disorders
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Patients and medical providers should be aware that chronic opioid use can interfere with sleep by reducing sleep efficiency and increasing the risk of sleep-disordered breathing.

Daily cannabis use lowers odds of using illicit opioids among people who have chronic pain
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

For those using illicit opioids to manage their chronic pain, cannabis may be a beneficial -- and a less dangerous -- alternative, according to new research.

Evidence in mice that childhood asthma is influenced by the neurotransmitter dopamine
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Neurons that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine communicate with T cells to enhance allergic inflammation in the lungs of young mice but not older mice, researchers report. The findings potentially explain why asthma susceptibility is higher in children. By highlighting the important role of interactions between the nervous system and the immune system in childhood asthma, the results could lead to new strategies for treating the common chronic disease.

Scientists use modern technology to understand how ochre paint was created in pictographs
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Ochre was often used as a vivid red paint in ancient rock art known as pictographs. Despite its broad use throughout human history and a modern focus on how the artistic symbolism is interpreted, little research exists on the paint itself and how it was produced. Now, scientists are using electron microscopes to understand how ochre paint was created by hunter-gatherers in North America to produce rock art located at Babine Lake in British Columbia.

Study on surface damage to vehicles traveling at hypersonic speeds
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Vehicles moving at hypersonic speeds are bombarded with ice crystals and dust particles in the surrounding atmosphere, making the surface material vulnerable to damage such as erosion and sputtering with each tiny collision. Researchers studied this interaction one molecule at a time to understand the processes, then scaled up the data to make it compatible with simulations that require a larger scale.

Bats in attics might be necessary for conservation
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Researchers investigate and describe the conservation importance of buildings relative to natural, alternative roosts for little brown bats in Yellowstone National Park.

Boredom is on the rise for adolescents, especially girls
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

New research has found that boredom is rising year after year for teens in 8th, 10th, and 12th grades, with greater increases for girls than boys.

Yoga and physical therapy as treatment for chronic lower back pain also improves sleep
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Yoga and physical therapy (PT) are effective approaches to treating co-occurring sleep disturbance and back pain while reducing the need for medication, according to a new study. The research showed significant improvements in sleep quality lasting 52 weeks after 12 weeks of yoga classes or 1-on-1 PT, which suggests a long-term benefit of these non-pharmacologic approaches.

When stuck in water, bees create a wave and hydrofoil atop it
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Ever see a bee stuck in a pool? He's surfing to escape.

Husbands' stress increases if wives earn more than 40% of household income
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Husbands are least stressed when their wives earn up to 40% of household income but they become increasingly uncomfortable as their spouse's wages rise beyond that point.

Scientists find evidence of missing neutron star
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

The leftovers from a spectacular supernova that revolutionized our understanding of how stars end their lives have finally been spotted by astronomers.

Catatonia in Down syndrome
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Down syndrome, due to an extra chromosome 21, occurs in 250,000 children and adults in the United States, making it the country's most common chromosomal disorder. Inherited heart defects, thyroid cancer, celiac disease and developmental disabilities are common Down syndrome complications. Only recently has catatonia, a behavioral condition marked by new onset immobility, mutism, withdrawal and other behavioral abnormalities, been recognized in Down syndrome.

New species of seaweed uncovered by genetic analyses
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Genetic analyses have revealed remarkably higher species diversity in common red seaweed than previously assumed. It was thought that there were only five related species of the Gloiopeltis genus worldwide. However, it has been revealed that there are over ten in Japan alone.

First high-speed straight motion of magnetic skyrmion at room temperature demonstrated
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Researchers have, for the first time, successfully demonstrated a formation and current-induced motion of synthetic antiferromagnetic magnetic skyrmions. The established findings are expected to pave the way towards new functional information processing and storage technologies.

Clean carbon nanotubes with superb properties
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Scientists have found a new way to make ultra-clean carbon nanotube transistors with superior semiconducting properties.

Rare gas find solves puzzle of Southern Africa's soaring landscape
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

The discovery of gases released from deep beneath the Earth's crust could help to explain Southern Africa's unusual landscape, a study suggests.

Unlocking the secrets of badger dispersal to minimize the spread of bovine TB
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

By understanding how, when, and why badgers move from one social group to another, researchers hope information gleaned from GPS devices will help them tailor vaccination programs to reduce the spread of bovine tuberculosis.

Atoms, molecules or even living cells can be manipulated with light beams
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Special light beams can be used to manipulate molecules or small biological particles. However, these optical tweezers only work with objects in empty space. Any disturbing environment would deflect the light waves and destroy the effect. This is a problem, in particular with biological samples. Now, a special method was developed to calculate the perfect wave form to manipulate small particles in the presence of a disordered environment, even if they cannot be touched directly.

Deep-sea bacteria copy their neighbors' diet
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

A new group of symbiotic bacteria in deep-sea mussels surprises with the way they fix carbon: They use the Calvin cycle to turn carbon into tasty food. The bacteria acquired the genes for this process from neighboring symbiotic bacteria in the mussel. These results call into question our current understanding of carbon fixation pathways in the deep sea.

Light-sensing camera may help detect extraterrestrial life, dark matter
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Researchers have made one of the highest-performance cameras ever composed of sensors that count single photons, or particles of light.

Huge tsunami hit Oman 1,000 years ago
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

15-meter high waves that pushed boulders the weight of a Leopard tank inland: This is more or less how one can imagine the tsunami that hit the coast of today's Sultanate of Oman about 1,000 years ago, as concluded by a recent study. The findings also show how urgently the region needs a well-functioning early warning system.

Uncovering the pathway to wine's acidity
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Wine researchers say their latest discovery may one day lead to winemakers being able to manipulate the acidity of wines without the costly addition of tartaric acid.

Beyond the green revolution
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

There has been a substantial increase in food production over the last 50 years, but it has been accompanied by a narrowing in the diversity of cultivated crops. New research shows that diversifying crop production can make food supply more nutritious, reduce resource demand and greenhouse gas emissions, and enhance climate resilience without reducing calorie production or requiring more land.

Artificial intelligence algorithm can learn the laws of quantum mechanics
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Artificial intelligence can be used to predict molecular wave functions and the electronic properties of molecules. This innovative AI method could be used to speed-up the design of drug molecules or new materials.

Complex organ models grown in the lab
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Scientists have successfully produced human tissues from stem cells. They have a complexity similar to that of normal tissue and are far superior to previous structures.

RNA regulation is crucial for embryonic stem cell differentiation
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Nuclear RNA levels are kept in check by RNA decay factors. Now, researchers show that an excess of RNA in the nucleus can have negative effects on a crucial regulator of stem cell differentiation.

Scientists engineer 'Venus flytrap' bio-sensors to snare pollutants
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

The biological sensors change color once they have successfully snared a target molecule, and will soon have a host of important environmental, medical and security applications.

Striking variation in mechanisms that drive sex selection in frogs
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Researchers have discovered striking variation in the underlying genetic machinery that orchestrates sexual differentiation in frogs, demonstrating that evolution of this crucial biological system has moved at a dramatic pace.

Trash talk hurts, even when it comes from a robot
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Trash talking has a long and colorful history of flustering game opponents, and now researchers have demonstrated that discouraging words can be perturbing even when uttered by a robot.

Decarbonizing the power sector
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Electricity supply is one of the biggest CO2 emitters globally. To keep global warming well below 2°C, several paths lead to zero emissions in the energy sector, and each has its potential environmental impacts -- such as air and water pollution, land-use or water demand. Using a first-time combination of multiple modelling systems, an international team of researchers has now quantified the actual benefits and downsides of three main roads to decarbonization.

Ayahuasca compound changes brainwaves to vivid 'waking-dream' state
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Scientists have peered inside the brain to show how taking DMT affects human consciousness by significantly altering the brain's electrical activity.

Boosting wind farmers, global winds reverse decades of slowing and pick up speed
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

In a boon to wind farms, average daily wind speeds are picking up across much of the globe after about 30 years of gradual slowing. Research shows that wind speeds in northern mid-latitude regions have increased by roughly 7% since 2010.

Impact of climate change on Arctic terns
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

New study shows how changes in Antarctic sea ice is driving one of the world's smallest seabirds to forage further for food.

Watch out for 'feather duvet lung' caution doctors
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Watch out for 'feather duvet lung' doctors have warned after treating a middle aged man with severe lung inflammation that developed soon after he bought feather-filled bedding.

Hear this: Healthful diet tied to lower risk of hearing loss
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Investigators have found that eating a healthy diet may reduce the risk of acquired hearing loss.

New screening method identifies inhibitors of cancer cell metabolism
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

A new screening system developed by scientists leverages redundancy in an important component of a cell - nucleotide metabolism - to help identify new drugs that specifically and potently block processes that are essential for cancer cell growth.

Get over it? When it comes to recycled water, consumers won't
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

If people are educated on recycled water, they may come to agree it's perfectly safe and tastes as good -- or better -- than their drinking water. They may even agree it's an answer to the critical water imbalance in California. But that doesn't mean they're going to use recycled water -- and it sure doesn't mean they'll drink it. And the reason lies in the word 'disgust.'


 

 

 

 

 

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