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Latest Research In the News ...

Air pollution in New York City linked to wildfires hundreds of miles away
Posted on Wednesday January 22, 2020

A new study shows that air pollutants from the smoke of fires from as far as Canada and the southeastern US traveled hundreds of miles and several days to reach Connecticut and New York City, where it caused significant increases in pollution concentrations.

Missing piece to urban air quality puzzle
Posted on Wednesday January 22, 2020

Air quality models have long failed to accurately predict atmospheric levels of secondary organic aerosol, which comprises a substantial fraction of the fine particulate matter in cities. But researchers have found a missing source of emissions that may explain roughly half of that SOA, closing much of the model-measurement gap.

New study debunks notion that salt consumption contributes to weight loss
Posted on Wednesday January 22, 2020

Researchers found that reducing sodium intake in adults with elevated blood pressure or hypertension decreased thirst, urine volume and blood pressure, but did not affect metabolic energy needs. These results support the traditional notion that decreasing sodium intake is critical to managing hypertension -- disputing recent studies.

Flooding damage to levees is cumulative -- and often invisible
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

Recent research finds that repeated flooding events have a cumulative effect on the structural integrity of earthen levees, suggesting that the increase in extreme weather events associated with climate change could pose significant challenges for the nation's aging levee system.

New species of antibiotic-resistant bacteria found in infected wound
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

A hitherto unknown antibiotic-resistant bacteria species, in the same family as E. coli and Salmonella spp., has been found and classified in Sweden. The proposed taxonomic name of the species -- the first of the new genus -- is Scandinavium goeteborgense, after the city of Gothenburg, Sweden, where the bacterium was isolated and the research was done.

Insect bites and warmer climate means double-trouble for plants
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

Scientists think that current models are incomplete and that we may be underestimating crop losses. A new study shows that infested tomato plants, in their efforts to fight off caterpillars, don't adapt well to rising temperatures. This double-edged sword worsens their productivity.

Walking sharks discovered in the tropics
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

Four new species of tropical sharks that use their fins to walk are causing a stir in waters off northern Australia and New Guinea.

Well-designed substrates make large single crystal bi-/tri-layer graphene possible
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

Scientists have reported the fabrication and use of single crystal copper-nickel alloy foil substrates for the growth of large-area, single crystal bilayer and trilayer graphene films.

Maternal depression and atopic dermatitis in children linked
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

A recent study suggests that maternal depression in the postpartum period, and even beyond, is associated with the development of atopic dermatitis throughout childhood and adolescence.

To reverse engineer dynamics of microbial communities, researchers construct their own
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

Scientific and public appreciation for microbes -- and the key role their communal actions play in environmental health, food production, and human wellness -- has grown in recent years. While initially considered to be static, uniform entities, microbial communities are highly complex and contain internal chemical swapfests that are in constant flux. Researchers have demonstrated that the dynamics of these communities can be explained and even predicted by examining the variability trait of microbial social interactions.

A model ecosystem fish story
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

Have I got a fish story for you. Any angler beginning a yarn like that usually ends up spinning a tall tale, an exaggeration or bald-faced lie. Researchers, however, have demonstrated that anglers can produce accurate and complex environmental models similar to those of trained scientists.

New technique to study molecules and materials on quantum simulator discovered
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

A new technique to study the properties of molecules and materials on a quantum simulator has been discovered.

Zebrafish teach researchers more about atrial fibrillation
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

Genetic research in zebrafish has surprised the researchers behind the study. The results have the potential to change the prevalent perception of the cardiac disorder atrial fibrillation.

New method to enable the production of cheaper, longer-lasting vaccines
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

A new method to produce vaccines that have a longer shelf-life, are cheaper and can be stored without the need for cooling has been developed.

Novel composite antimicrobial film could take a bite out of foodborne illnesses
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

A novel composite film -- created by the bonding of an antimicrobial layer to conventional, clear polyethylene plastic typically used to vacuum-package foods such as meat and fish -- could help to decrease foodborne illness outbreaks, according to researchers.

How fruit flies flock together in orderly clusters
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

Opposing desires to congregate and maintain some personal space drive fruit flies to form orderly clusters, according to a new study.

Feeding the world without wrecking the planet is possible
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

A study now suggests a comprehensive solution package for feeding 10 billion people within our planet's environmental boundaries. Supplying a sufficient and healthy diet for every person whilst keeping our biosphere largely intact will require no less than a technological and socio-cultural U-turn. It includes adopting radically different ways of farming, reduction of food waste, and dietary changes.

A chronicle of giant straight-tusked elephants
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

About 800,000 years ago, the giant straight-tusked elephant Palaeoloxodon migrated out of Africa and became widespread across Europe and Asia.

Blue light triggers memory and emphatic fear in mice via a non-invasive approach
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

Researchers have engineered an improved biological tool that controls calcium (Ca2+) levels in the brain via blue light. This monster-OptoSTIM1 causes a change in mice's fear learning behavior without the need of optic fiber implants in the brain.

Modified plants to curb climate change
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

New technologies are needed to combat climate change. Now bioinformatics specialists might have found a way of enabling plants to store more carbon dioxide.

Emissions of potent greenhouse gas have grown, contradicting reports of huge reductions
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

Despite reports that global emissions of the potent greenhouse gas were almost eliminated in 2017, an international team of scientists has found atmospheric levels growing at record values.

First detailed electronic study of new nickelate superconductor finds 3D metallic state
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

Unlike cuprates -- the first known class of unconventional superconductors -- the new nickelates are inherently metallic, sharing electrons with intervening layers of rare earth material to create a 3D metallic state. This is an entirely new type of ground state for transition metal oxides such as cuprates and nickelates, researchers said. It opens new directions for experiments and theoretical studies of how superconductivity arises and how it can be optimized in this system and possibly in other compounds.

Art speaks for itself and makes hearts beat faster
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

Information about an artwork has no effect on the aesthetic experience of museum visitors. The characteristics of the artwork itself have a much stronger impact on observers.

Parrots collaborate with invisible partners
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

New study shows that peach-fronted conures have a surprisingly advanced talent for collaboration when it comes to finding food. This is important knowledge for biologists working with conservation of wild bird populations.

Warmer and acidified oceans can lead to 'hidden' changes in species behavior
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

Scientists have shown that the peppery furrow shell (Scrobicularia plana) makes considerable changes to its feeding habits when faced with warmer and more acidified oceans.

Record-breaking terahertz laser beam
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

Terahertz radiation is used for security checks at airports, for medical examinations and also for quality checks in industry. However, radiation in the terahertz range is extremely difficult to generate. Scientists have now succeeded in developing a terahertz radiation source that breaks several records: it is extremely efficient, and its spectrum is very broad -- it generates different wavelengths from the entire terahertz range. This opens up the possibility of creating short radiation pulses with extremely high radiation intensity.

The salt of the comet
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

Researchers have found an explanation for why very little nitrogen could previously be accounted for in the nebulous covering of comets: the building block for life predominantly occurs in the form of ammonium salts, the occurrence of which could not previously be measured. The salts may be a further indication that comet impacts may have made life on Earth possible in the first place.

Dialing up the heat on nanoparticles
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

Rapid progress in the field of metallic nanotechnology is sparking a science revolution that is likely to impact all areas of society, according to a professor of physics.

Addressing global warming with new nanoparticles and sunshine
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

Harvesting sunlight, IBS scientists reported a new strategy to transform carbon dioxide (CO2) into oxygen (O2) and pure carbon monoxide (CO) without side-products in water. This artificial photosynthesis method could bring new solutions to environmental pollution and global warming.

Light-up wheels: Unique organic light-emitting molecular emitters
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

Researchers synthesized novel OLEDs based on efficient ring-shaped molecular macrocycles. This work may help lead to sensitive, yet inexpensive, chemical detectors.

'Ancient' cellular discovery key to new cancer therapies
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

Researchers have uncovered a metabolic system which could lead to new strategies for therapeutic cancer treatment. A team has found a link between a metabolic system in a yeast, and now mammals, which is critical for the regulation of cell growth and proliferation.

Platypus on brink of extinction
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

New research calls for national action to minimize the risk of the platypus vanishing due to habitat destruction, dams and weirs.

TB bacteria survive in amoebae found in soil
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

Scientists have discovered that the bacterium which causes bovine TB can survive and grow in small, single-celled organisms found in soil and dung. It is believed that originally the bacterium evolved to survive in these single-celled organisms known as amoebae and in time progressed to infect and cause TB in larger animals such as cattle.

Insecticides are becoming more toxic to honey bees
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

Researchers discover that neonicotinoid seed treatments are driving a dramatic increase in insecticide toxicity in U.S. agricultural landscapes, despite evidence that these treatments have little to no benefit in many crops.

Arctic sea ice can't 'bounce back'
Posted on Tuesday January 21, 2020

Arctic sea ice cannot 'quickly bounce back' if climate change causes it to melt, new research suggests.

Setting controlled fires to avoid wildfires
Posted on Monday January 20, 2020

Despite having proven effective at reducing wildfire risks, prescribed burns have been stymied by perceived and real risks, regulations and resource shortages. A new analysis highlights ways of overcoming those barriers, offering solutions for wildfire-ravaged landscapes.

Wisdom of the crowd? Building better forecasts from suboptimal predictors
Posted on Monday January 20, 2020

Scientists have shown how to combine the forecasts of a collection of suboptimal 'delay embedding' predictors for time series data. This work may help improve the forecasting of floods, stock market gyrations, spatio-temporal brain dynamics, and ecological resource fluctuations.

Strongly 'handed' squirrels less good at learning
Posted on Monday January 20, 2020

Squirrels that strongly favor their left or right side are less good at learning, new research suggests.

Becoming less active and gaining weight: Downsides of becoming an adult
Posted on Monday January 20, 2020

Leaving school and getting a job both lead to a drop in the amount of physical activity, while becoming a mother is linked to increased weight gain, conclude two reviews.

Combined prenatal smoking and drinking greatly increases SIDS risk
Posted on Monday January 20, 2020

Children born to mothers who both drank and smoked beyond the first trimester of pregnancy have a 12-fold increased risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) compared to those unexposed or only exposed in the first trimester of pregnancy, according to a new study.


 

 

 

 

 

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