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Real risks associated with cannabis exposure during pregnancy
Posted on Friday January 17, 2020

A new study has definitively shown that regular exposure to THC, the main psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, during pregnancy has significant impact on placental and fetal development.

Internet use reduces study skills in university students
Posted on Friday January 17, 2020

Research has shown that students who use digital technology excessively are less motivated to engage with their studies, and are more anxious about tests. This effect was made worse by the increased feelings of loneliness that use of digital technology produced.

Walnuts may be good for the gut and help promote heart health
Posted on Thursday January 16, 2020

Researchers found that eating walnuts daily as part of a healthy diet was associated with increases in certain bacteria that can help promote health. Additionally, those changes in gut bacteria were associated with improvements in some risk factors for heart disease.

Whooping cough evolving into a superbug
Posted on Thursday January 16, 2020

Whooping cough bacteria are becoming smarter at colonizing and feeding off unwitting hosts -- whether they have been vaccinated or not -- strengthening calls for a new vaccine.

Small change for climate change: Time to increase research funding to save the world
Posted on Thursday January 16, 2020

A new study shows that there is a huge disproportion in the level of funding for social science research into the greatest challenge in combating global warming -- how to get individuals and societies to overcome ingrained human habits to make the changes necessary to mitigate climate change.

Drinking 1% rather than 2% milk accounts for 4.5 years of less aging in adults
Posted on Wednesday January 15, 2020

A new study shows drinking low-fat milk -- both nonfat and 1% milk -- is significantly associated with less aging in adults.

BPA activates immune response in mice that passes down through generations
Posted on Wednesday January 15, 2020

Some plastic food and beverage containers still contain bisphenol A (BPA), which can mimic the hormone estrogen. Although experts say that small amounts of BPA detected in foods are unlikely to cause problems, some people worry that constant low-level exposures could have health effects, especially for developing fetuses, infants and children. Now, researchers report that in mice, BPA activates an immune response that persists for at least three generations.

Beauty sleep could be real, say body clock biologists
Posted on Wednesday January 15, 2020

Biologists have explained for the first time why having a good night's sleep really could prepare us for the rigors of the day ahead.

DNA Damage to Breast Cells from chemicals in some cosmetics, sunscreens
Posted on Wednesday January 15, 2020

A new approach to studying the effects of two common chemicals used in cosmetics and sunscreens found they can cause DNA damage in breast cells at surprisingly low concentrations, while the same dose did not harm cells without estrogen receptors.

How coworkers impact the value of your skills
Posted on Wednesday January 15, 2020

New research uncovers the importance of teams and coworkers in shaping productivity, earning potential, and stays of employment. The research analyzed data from Sweden. It found that to earn high wages and returns on education, workers must find coworkers who complement their own skills rather than duplicate them.

Good connections key to startup success
Posted on Wednesday January 15, 2020

The future potential of early stage startups can be assessed by their existing professional relationships, research suggests.

Having less sex linked to earlier menopause
Posted on Wednesday January 15, 2020

Women who engage in sexual activity weekly or monthly have a lower risk of entering menopause early relative to those who report having some form of sex less than monthly, according to a new study.

Clothes last longer and shed fewer microfibers in quicker, cooler washing cycles
Posted on Tuesday January 14, 2020

First research into impact of wash cycle times shows that shorter, cooler washes: help clothes keep their color and last longer, when compared to warmer, longer cycles; release significantly fewer microfibers into wastewater; significantly reduce color transfer, a major cause of lights and whites becoming duller.

Who's liable? The AV or the human driver?
Posted on Tuesday January 14, 2020

Researchers have developed a joint fault-based liability rule that can be used to regulate both self-driving car manufacturers and human drivers. They propose a game-theoretic model that describes the strategic interactions among the law maker, the self-driving car manufacturer, the self-driving car, and human drivers, and examine how, as the market penetration of AVs increases, the liability rule should evolve.

More federal funding needed to increase Americans' active transportation habits
Posted on Tuesday January 14, 2020

The federal government has allocated only about 2 percent of its transportation funds to encourage walking and cycling, not nearly enough to make a significant difference, according to new research.

'Coolsculpting' inventors develop new non-surgical method for targeting fat
Posted on Tuesday January 14, 2020

Researchers are developing a new form 'Coolsculpting' technology that can selectively reduce fat almost anywhere in the body using a safe, injectable ice solution or 'slurry.'

Siblings of children with intellectual disabilities score high on empathy and closeness
Posted on Tuesday January 14, 2020

A new study finds that relationships between children and their siblings with intellectual disabilities are more positive than those between typically developing siblings.

Impaired driving -- even once the high wears off
Posted on Tuesday January 14, 2020

Researchers have discovered that recreational marijuana use affects driving ability even when users are not intoxicated. Cannabis users had more accidents, drove at higher speeds, and drove through more red lights than non-users.

'Marshmallow test' redux: Children show better self-control when they depend on each other
Posted on Tuesday January 14, 2020

The researchers say their experiments are the first to show that children are more willing to delay gratification for cooperative reasons than for individual goals.

Flame retardants and pesticides overtake heavy metals as biggest contributors to IQ loss
Posted on Tuesday January 14, 2020

Adverse outcomes from childhood exposures to lead and mercury are on the decline in the United States, likely due to decades of restrictions on the use of heavy metals, a new study finds.

Global diets are converging, with benefits and problems
Posted on Tuesday January 14, 2020

Research has shown that diets are changing in complex ways worldwide. International food supply patterns are supporting healthier diets in parts of the world, but causing underweight and obesity elsewhere. They are also having important effects on environmental sustainability, with potentially worrying consequences.

Children's packed lunches lack nutritional quality
Posted on Tuesday January 14, 2020

Fewer than two in every 100 packed lunches eaten by children in English primary schools meet nutritional standards, according to a major survey. Although the amount of sugary food in lunchboxes declined over 10 years it is still higher than recommended, and there has been a drop in essential vitamins and minerals. Researchers say the lack of fresh food is to blame.

Long-term memory performance depends upon gating system
Posted on Monday January 13, 2020

Why do we remember some experiences for our entire lives but quickly forget others? The brain is constantly deciding which events are important enough for long-term storage. A new study sheds light on one element of that process.

College students use more marijuana in states where it's legal, but they binge drink less
Posted on Monday January 13, 2020

Marijuana use among college students has been trending upward for years, but in states that have legalized recreational marijuana, use has jumped even higher. A study shows that in states where marijuana was legalized by 2018, both occasional and frequent use among college students has continued to rise beyond the first year of legalization, suggesting an ongoing trend rather than a brief period of experimentation.

'Value instantiation' key to luxury brands' and social responsibility
Posted on Monday January 13, 2020

Although luxury brands and social responsibility seem fundamentally inconsistent with each other, the two entities can coexist in the mind of the consumer, provided the brand can find someone -- typically, a celebrity -- who successfully embodies the two conflicting value sets, says new research.

Risk of lead exposure linked to decreased brain volume in adolescents
Posted on Monday January 13, 2020

In a study using brain scans from nearly 10 thousand adolescents across the country, investigators show that risk of lead exposure is associated with altered brain anatomy and cognitive deficits in children from low income families.

When pregnant moms are stressed out, babies' brains suffer
Posted on Monday January 13, 2020

Knowing that your unborn fetus has congenital heart disease causes such pronounced maternal stress, anxiety and depression that these women's fetuses end up with impaired development in key brain regions before they are born, according to new research.

Study sheds light on link between cannabis, anxiety and stress
Posted on Monday January 13, 2020

A molecule produced by the brain that activates the same receptors as marijuana is protective against stress by reducing anxiety-causing connections between two brain regions, researchers report.

'Ageotypes' provide window into how individuals age
Posted on Monday January 13, 2020

Scientists have identified specific biological pathways along which individuals age over time.

Common foods can help 'landscape' the jungle of our gut microbiome
Posted on Monday January 13, 2020

Foods such as honey, licorice, oregano, and hot sauce have an antimicrobial effect and some of them trigger phage production in our gut. We could use compounds in these foods to control harmful microbes and balance microbial diversity in the gut microbiome, new research suggests.

Collective leadership groups maintain cohesion and act decisively
Posted on Monday January 13, 2020

Members of collective leadership groups can maintain cohesion and act decisively when faced with a crisis, in spite of lacking the formal authority to do so, according to new research.

A replacement for exercise?
Posted on Monday January 13, 2020

Researchers recently found that Sestrin, a naturally occurring protein in the body, mimicked the benefits of exercise in flies and mice.

Prenatal exposure to flame retardants linked to reading problems
Posted on Friday January 10, 2020

A new study suggests that prenatal exposure to flame retardants may increase the risk of reading problems.

Hikikomori: New definition helps identify, treat extreme social isolation
Posted on Friday January 10, 2020

Experts in the Japanese phenomena of hikikomori say the condition of extreme social isolation is more widespread than previously acknowledged, and it deserves a clear and consistent definition to improve treatment across the globe. A simplified and clear definition will improve the recognition and subsequent treatment for people who suffer from the condition.

What happens to deferred intentions in the brain?
Posted on Friday January 10, 2020

Placing a checkmark on the to-do list is an extremely liberating feeling for many eager list lovers, especially when the task has been postponed for a long time. But what happens in our brain when we have completed a postponed task? Will it be deactivated? If so, how? A team of scientists from the Collaborative Research Centre 940 'Volition and Cognitive Control' at TU Dresden, together with two leading international experts, Julie Bugg and Michael Scullin, investigated these questions in a systematic review article.

Lonely in a crowd: Overcoming loneliness with acceptance and wisdom
Posted on Friday January 10, 2020

Researchers found the main characteristics of loneliness in a senior housing community and the strategies residents use to overcome it.

40% of gun owners reported not locking all guns, even around kids
Posted on Friday January 10, 2020

Gun owners will go to events to get free devices for locking up their firearms at home, but a survey of nearly 3,000 participants at such events in Washington found that 40% had unlocked guns at home, and the presence of children in the home did not make a difference.

Baby and adult brains 'sync up' during play
Posted on Thursday January 09, 2020

A team of researchers has conducted the first study of how baby and adult brains interact during natural play, and they found measurable connections in their neural activity. In other words, baby and adult brain activity rose and fell together as they shared toys and eye contact.

Explaining link between emotion and addictive substance use
Posted on Thursday January 09, 2020

What drives a person to smoke cigarettes? What role do emotions play in this addictive behavior? Why do some smokers puff more often and more deeply or relapse many years after they've quit? If policy makers had those answers, how could they strengthen the fight against the global smoking epidemic? A new report by researchers offers a key insight: sadness plays an especially strong role in triggering addictive behavior relative to other negative emotions like disgust.

Common chemical disrupts reproductive biology
Posted on Thursday January 09, 2020

Experiments in worms reveal the molecular damage caused by DEHP, a chemical commonly used to make plastics flexible. DEHP interferes with proper cell division during egg formation, leads to excessive DNA breakage, alters chromosome appearance. Abnormalities help explain known link between DEHP and human birth defects, male infertility. If replicated in further research, the insights can help inform regulatory changes, consumer choice.

BPA replacement, BPS, hinders heart function, study reveals
Posted on Thursday January 09, 2020

BPA's counterpart replacement BPS can hinder heart function within minutes of a single exposure, according to a new study.

Parents aren't powerless when it comes to sleep-deprived teenagers
Posted on Thursday January 09, 2020

Teenagers in the US simply don't get enough shut eye. The consequences of this sleep deprivation epidemic are extensive and include increasing rates of anxiety and depression among adolescents, as well as suicidal thoughts and actions. Researchers found that a simple and timeworn solution yields solid results: a clear bedtime that parents consistently enforce.

Plants' 'organic' wounds improve produce
Posted on Thursday January 09, 2020

Scientists found benefits of insect leaf-wounding in fruit and vegetable production. Stress responses created in the fruits and vegetables initiated an increase in antioxidant compounds prior to harvest, making them healthier for human consumption.

From as young as 4, children see males as more powerful than females
Posted on Thursday January 09, 2020

As early as 4 years old, children associate power and masculinity, even in countries considered to be more egalitarian like Norway. Researchers also show that in some situations the power-masculinity association does not manifest in girls.

Kangaroo mother care reduces infant mortality
Posted on Thursday January 09, 2020

When newborn babies with low birth weight are held close to their mother's bodies throughout the day, their chance of survival increases substantially.

Food textures affect perceptions of healthiness
Posted on Thursday January 09, 2020

New research has demonstrated how food producers could change the surface texture of products to change people's perceptions and promote healthy eating.

Tea drinkers live longer
Posted on Thursday January 09, 2020

Drinking tea at least three times a week is linked with a longer and healthier life, according to a new study.

New vaccines to protect infants against infections
Posted on Wednesday January 08, 2020

A new study puts researchers within closer reach of vaccines that can protect infants against infections by overcoming a mother's antibodies, which are known to shut down immune defenses initiated by conventional vaccines. That hurdle largely explains why vaccinations for infectious diseases like influenza and measles not given until six to 12 months of age.

'She' goes missing from presidential language
Posted on Wednesday January 08, 2020

Researchers have found that although a significant percentage of the American public believed the winner of the November 2016 presidential election would be a woman, people rarely used the pronoun 'she' when referring to the next president before the election.

New mathematical model shows how diversity speeds consensus
Posted on Wednesday January 08, 2020

Scientific literature abounds with examples of ways in which member diversity can benefit a group -- whether spider colonies' ability to forage or an industrial company's financial performance. Now, a newly published mathematical framework substantiates the seemingly counterintuitive observations made by prior scholars: interaction among dissimilar individuals can speed consensus.

Highlighting women's achievements makes them want to be the boss, research shows
Posted on Wednesday January 08, 2020

Highlighting female achievements in the workplace makes capable women significantly more likely to want to be the boss, a study shows.

Urban health scare: E-scooters show alarming spike in injuries
Posted on Wednesday January 08, 2020

Electric scooters are increasingly part of the crowded urban landscape, but a new study has found a major surge of injuries related to scooters, particularly among young adults.

Examining vaping particle size and deposition
Posted on Wednesday January 08, 2020

E-cigarette use is rising, particularly among young adults and teens. Recent illnesses and deaths attributed to vaping have caused intense scrutiny of the chemicals in e-liquids and vapor, but little is known about the size of vaping particles and their deposition patterns in human airways. Now, researchers have analyzed how e-cigarette particle size and deposition change with factors such as device power, e-liquid composition and vaping practices.

Most meat eaters support veganism as 'ethical' and good for the environment
Posted on Wednesday January 08, 2020

A new survey of 1000 meat eaters finds support for the principles of veganism, but suggests most think it is inconvenient, expensive and a sacrifice in terms of taste.

Just don't eat it: Play Doh, dry pasta show little gluten transfer when used for play
Posted on Wednesday January 08, 2020

Parents who worry their child with celiac disease may be exposed to gluten at school might be able to strike two common school substances -- Play Doh and dry, uncooked pasta -- from the exposure risk list, as long as children don't consume them. A preliminary study found no significant gluten transfer on hands or surfaces after children used these items for classroom and sensory play.

Lifestyle choices could slow familial frontotemporal dementia
Posted on Wednesday January 08, 2020

A physically and mentally active lifestyle confers resilience to frontotemporal dementia (FTD), even in people whose genetic profile makes the eventual development of the disease virtually inevitable, according to new research.

Children frequently receive unnecessary medical care regardless of insurance type
Posted on Tuesday January 07, 2020

Children with public insurance are slightly more likely to receive medical services that they don't need than those with private insurance, a new study finds.

Correcting vaccine misinformation is a difficult process, study shows
Posted on Tuesday January 07, 2020

Researchers found that vaccine misinformation in Danish media outlets from 2013-2016 led to HPV vaccinations dropping by 50.4%. An information campaign geared toward concerned parents helped increase vaccine uptake again, but uptake is still below the level before misinformation began, showing how difficult it is to undo the damages misinformation causes.

Want to turn back time? Try running a marathon
Posted on Tuesday January 07, 2020

The new year means it's time to set resolutions for 2020 and new research suggests running a marathon for the first time could have several health benefits. The study found that for first-time marathon runners, training and completion of the marathon was associated with reductions in blood pressure and aortic stiffening in healthy participants that were equivalent to a four-year reduction in vascular age.

Young women still may be getting unnecessary pelvic exams
Posted on Tuesday January 07, 2020

Pelvic examinations and cervical cancer screenings are no longer recommended for most females under age 21 during routine health visits, but a new study has found that millions of young women are unnecessarily undergoing the tests, which can lead to false-positive testing, over-treatment, anxiety and needless cost.


 

 

 

 

 

 

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