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Living Well In the News ...

Knowledge-sharing: a how-to guide
Posted on Friday December 13, 2019

How is knowledge exchanged and shared when interdisciplinary research teams work together? Researchers have investigated this by studying several different research projects. Their study makes concrete recommendations for how teams can best work together and achieve effective collaborations.

Scientists say you can change your personality
Posted on Thursday December 12, 2019

A review of recent research in personality science points to the possibility that personality traits can change through persistent intervention and major life events.

Achieving optimal collaboration when goals conflict
Posted on Thursday December 12, 2019

New research suggests that, when two people must work together on a physical task despite conflicting goals, the amount of information available about each other's actions influences how quickly and optimally they learn to collaborate.

Transformative change can save humans and nature
Posted on Thursday December 12, 2019

Human impacts on life on Earth are unprecedented, requiring transformative action to address root economic, social and technological causes.

Want to avoid the holiday blues? New report suggests skipping the sweet treats
Posted on Thursday December 12, 2019

A new study from a team of clinical psychologists suggests eating added sugars -- common in so many holiday foods -- can trigger metabolic, inflammatory and neurobiological processes tied to depressive illness.

Experts review evidence yoga is good for the brain
Posted on Thursday December 12, 2019

Scientists have known for decades that aerobic exercise strengthens the brain and contributes to the growth of new neurons, but few studies have examined how yoga affects the brain. A review of the science finds evidence that yoga enhances many of the same brain structures and functions that benefit from aerobic exercise.

Running research: Heel-toe or toe-heel?
Posted on Thursday December 12, 2019

New research suggests there is no evidence that changing a runner's strike pattern will help prevent injuries or give them a speed boost.

Importance of breastfeeding in preventing diabetes reaffirmed in rat study
Posted on Thursday December 12, 2019

New research published today shows that breastfeeding is crucial in preventing diabetes. The World Health Organization recommends breastfeeding as the sole source of nutrition for infants until six months of age, as this helps reduce child morbidity and mortality. In contrast, early weaning is associated with both the development of obesity and Type 2 diabetes in adulthood.

Take long naps? Sleep more than nine hours a night? Your stroke risk may be higher
Posted on Wednesday December 11, 2019

People who take long naps during the day or sleep nine or more hours at night may have an increased risk of stroke, according to a new study.

Researchers discover brain circuit linked to food impulsivity
Posted on Wednesday December 11, 2019

A team of researchers has now identified a specific circuit in the brain that alters food impulsivity.

All age groups worldwide 'at high risk' of drop in children's physical activity
Posted on Wednesday December 11, 2019

Emphasis on particular groups hinders efforts to address the problem of declining physical activity in children, according to a new study.

New spray gel could help take the bite out of frostbite
Posted on Wednesday December 11, 2019

Mountaineers and winter sports enthusiasts know the dangers of frostbite -- the tissue damage that can occur when extremities, such as the nose, ears, fingers and toes, are exposed to very cold temperatures. However, it can be difficult to get treated quickly in remote, snowbound areas. Now, researchers have developed a convenient gel that could be sprayed onto frostbite injuries when they occur, helping wounds heal.

The songwriter is creative -- the singer, not so much
Posted on Wednesday December 11, 2019

Country music songwriters must perform a careful dance when they work with famous singers who may be less talented at writing songs but bring the needed star power to attract fans -- and, importantly, to get the song recorded in the first place, research suggests. A study of 39 successful country-music songwriters found that they use two strategies to navigate creative collaboration with more famous artists.

New research seeks to improve safety equipment for pregnant women
Posted on Wednesday December 11, 2019

As technology advances in the things we use every day, it's generally accepted they also become safer. But according to one engineer, that may not be true for a large portion of the population. New research has developed a innovative model to map the impact of trauma on a pregnant woman and her uterus if she were involved in an accident -- with the hopes of making everything from airbags to seatbelts safer for all.

Lower BMI means lower diabetes risk, even among non-overweight people
Posted on Tuesday December 10, 2019

Lower body mass index (BMI) is consistently associated with reduced type II diabetes risk, among people with varied family history, genetic risk factors and weight, according to a new study.

Have you found meaning in life? Answer determines health and well-being
Posted on Tuesday December 10, 2019

A recent study has found that the presence of and search for meaning in life are important for health and well-being, though the relationships differ in adults younger and older than age 60.

Me, me, me! How narcissism changes throughout life
Posted on Tuesday December 10, 2019

New research conducted the longest study on narcissism to date, revealing how it changes over time.

Have your health and eat meat too
Posted on Monday December 09, 2019

Barbecued, stir-fried or roasted, there's no doubt that Aussies love their meat. Consuming on average nearly 100 kilograms of meat per person per year, Australians are among the top meat consumers worldwide. But with statistics showing that most Australians suffer from a poor diet, and red meat production adding to greenhouse-gas emissions, finding a balance between taste preferences, environmental protection, and health benefits is becoming critical.

Researcher designs headphones that warn pedestrians of dangers
Posted on Monday December 09, 2019

To counter a growing public safety concern, researchers are designing an intelligent headphone system that warns pedestrians of imminent dangers.

Community characteristics shape climate change discussions after extreme weather
Posted on Monday December 09, 2019

Political affiliations, the presence of local environmental organizations and prior local media coverage of climate change play a role in how a community reacts to an extreme weather event, according to new research.

Aspirin's health benefits under scrutiny
Posted on Monday December 09, 2019

Taking a baby aspirin every day to prevent a heart attack or stroke should no longer be recommended to patients who haven't already experienced one of these events, new research suggests.

How playing the drums changes the brain
Posted on Monday December 09, 2019

People who play drums regularly for years differ from unmusical people in their brain structure and function. The results of a new study suggest that they have fewer, but thicker fibers in the main connecting tract between the two halves of the brain. In addition, their motor brain areas are organized more efficiently.

Play sports for a healthier brain
Posted on Monday December 09, 2019

There have been many headlines in recent years about the potentially negative impacts contact sports can have on athletes' brains. But a new study shows that, in the absence of injury, athletes across a variety of sports -- including football, soccer and hockey -- have healthier brains than non-athletes.

You create your own false information, study finds
Posted on Monday December 09, 2019

Along with partisan news outlets and political blogs, there's another surprising source of misinformation on controversial topics -- it's you. A new study found that people given accurate statistics on a controversial issue tended to misremember those numbers to fit commonly held beliefs.

Women, exercise and longevity
Posted on Saturday December 07, 2019

Women who can exercise vigorously are at significantly lower risk of dying from heart disease, cancer and other causes.

Dramatic health benefits following air pollution reduction
Posted on Friday December 06, 2019

Reductions in air pollution yielded fast and dramatic impacts on health-outcomes, as well as decreases in all-cause morbidity, according to new findings.

Study debunks notion that C-section would increase risk of obesity in the child
Posted on Friday December 06, 2019

Women who have C-sections are no more likely to have children who develop obesity than women who give birth naturally, according to a large study. The findings contradict several smaller studies that did find an association between C-section deliveries and offspring obesity but did not consider the numerous maternal and prenatal factors that the researchers did in this study.

Cellphone distraction linked to increase in head injuries
Posted on Thursday December 05, 2019

Head and neck injuries incurred while driving or walking with a cellphone are on the rise -- and correlates with the launch of the iPhone in 2007 and release of Pokémon Go in 2016, a new study found.

Mobile devices blur work and personal privacy raising cyber risks
Posted on Thursday December 05, 2019

Organizations aren't moving quickly enough on cyber security threats linked to the drive toward using personal mobile devices in the workplace.

Clinical study finds eating within 10-hour window may help stave off diabetes, heart disease
Posted on Thursday December 05, 2019

Researchers have found that a 10-hour time-restricted eating intervention, when combined with traditional medications, resulted in weight loss, reduced abdominal fat, lower blood pressure and cholesterol for participants. The pilot study could lead to a new treatment option for metabolic syndrome patients who are at risk for developing life-altering and costly medical conditions such as diabetes.

Using green products leads to a warm glow in shoppers
Posted on Thursday December 05, 2019

A new article suggests that spending some of that money on green products might make consumers feel quite a bit better about their purchases. The study looks at the so-called ''greenconsumption effect'' -- how using a green product creates a ''warm glow'' feeling in users -- and what it means for retailers in an increasingly eco-conscious marketplace.

Prenatal and early life exposure to multiple air pollutants increases odds of toddler allergies
Posted on Thursday December 05, 2019

A new article shows a significant association between multiple prenatal and early life exposures to indoor pollutants and the degree of allergic sensitivity in 2-year-olds.

Once-a-month oral contraceptive pill in development
Posted on Thursday December 05, 2019

Investigators have designed a drug-delivery vehicle that consists of six arms joined by an elastic-coated core. The arms were loaded with the oral contraceptive drug levonorgestrel and folded up into a capsule that can be swallowed. Once in the stomach, the arms unfold and have a span that is larger than the opening of the human pylorus, helping the system stay in the stomach where it can release the drug over time.

Probiotic may help treat colic in infants
Posted on Wednesday December 04, 2019

Probiotics -- or 'good bacteria' -- have been used to treat infant colic with varying success. In a new trial, investigators have shown that drops containing a particular probiotic strain (Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12) reduced the duration of daily crying by more than 50% in 80% of the 40 infants who received the probiotic once daily for 28 days, with beneficial effects on sleep duration and on stool frequency and consistency.

By imaging the brain, scientists can predict a person's aptitude for cognitive training
Posted on Wednesday December 04, 2019

People with specific brain attributes are more likely than others to benefit from targeted cognitive interventions designed to enhance fluid intelligence, scientists report in a new study. Fluid intelligence is a measure of one's ability to adapt to new situations and solve never-before-seen problems.

Controlling attention with brain waves
Posted on Wednesday December 04, 2019

Having trouble paying attention? Neuroscientists may have a solution for you: Turn down your alpha brain waves. In a new study, the researchers found that people can enhance their attention by controlling their own alpha brain waves based on neurofeedback they receive as they perform a particular task.

Short-term radon test kits are not effective in measuring radon gas exposure
Posted on Wednesday December 04, 2019

A new study finds the only reliable way to measure exposure to radon gas is with a long-term testing kit, 90 or more days. Researchers placed two test kits, a short term (five-day) and long term (90-day) in the same homes. Tests were conducted during summer and winter months. Findings showed the short-term kits were imprecise up to 99 percent of the time when compared to a long term test.

Permanent hair dye and straighteners may increase breast cancer risk
Posted on Wednesday December 04, 2019

Scientists found that women who use permanent hair dye and chemical hair straighteners have a higher risk of developing breast cancer than women who don't use these products. The study suggests that breast cancer risk increased with more frequent use of these chemical hair products.

Study finds key brain region smaller in birth control pill users
Posted on Wednesday December 04, 2019

Researchers studying the brain found that women taking oral contraceptives, commonly known as birth control pills, had significantly smaller hypothalamus volume, compared to women not taking the pill, according to a new study.

Respiration key to increase oxygen in the brain
Posted on Wednesday December 04, 2019

Contrary to accepted knowledge, blood can bring more oxygen to mice brains when they exercise because the increased respiration packs more oxygen into the hemoglobin, according to an international team of researchers who believe that this holds true for all mammals.

Siting cell towers needs careful planning
Posted on Tuesday December 03, 2019

The health impacts of radio-frequency radiation (RFR) are still inconclusive, but the data to date warrants more caution in placing cell towers. An engineering team considers the current understanding of health impacts and possible solutions, which indicate a 500-meter (one third of a mile) buffer around schools and hospitals may help reduce risk for vulnerable populations.

How does protein fit in your holiday diet or New Year's resolutions?
Posted on Tuesday December 03, 2019

While some diets load up on protein and other diets dictate protein sources, it can be hard to know what to consume while managing weight or during weight loss. A new study by nutrition scientists shows that eating more protein daily than what is recommended may benefit only a few - those who are actively losing weight by cutting calories or those strength training to build more lean muscle mass.

Virtual reality could help flu vaccination rates
Posted on Tuesday December 03, 2019

Using a virtual reality simulation to show how flu spreads and its impact on others could be a way to encourage more people to get a flu vaccination, according to a new study.

How does language emerge?
Posted on Tuesday December 03, 2019

How did the almost 6,000 languages of the world come into being? Researchers have tried to simulate the process of developing a new communication system in an experiment -- with surprising results: even preschool children can spontaneously develop communication systems that exhibit core properties of natural language.

Pot while pregnant: Doctors urge caution
Posted on Tuesday December 03, 2019

Daily marijuana use during pregnancy may lead to an increased risk of low birth weight, low resistance to infection, decreased oxygen levels and other negative fetal health outcomes, according to a new study.

Fake news feels less immoral to share when we've seen it before
Posted on Tuesday December 03, 2019

People who repeatedly encounter a fake news item may feel less and less unethical about sharing it on social media, even when they don't believe the information, research indicates.

Citizen scientists deserve more credit, researchers argue
Posted on Tuesday December 03, 2019

Biologists argue that newfound respect for indigenous knowledge and changes in technology mean that non-professionals are taking greater roles in science work.

Through the eyes of animals
Posted on Tuesday December 03, 2019

Humans are now closer to seeing through the eyes of animals, thanks to an innovative software framework.

Throwing cold water on ice baths: Avoid this strategy for repairing or building muscle
Posted on Tuesday December 03, 2019

New research suggests that ice baths aren't helpful for repairing and building muscle over time, because they decrease the generation of protein in muscles.

Cats' faces hard to read, except for 'cat whisperers'
Posted on Tuesday December 03, 2019

Women and those with veterinary experience were better at recognizing cats' expressions -- even those who reported no strong attachment to cats. The study involved more than 6,300 people from 85 countries. Most participants found the test challenging. Their average score was 12 out of 20 -- somewhat above chance. But 13 percent of participants performed well, correctly scoring 15 or better -- a group informally called 'the cat whisperers.'

The deadly superbugs lurking in more than nine in ten make-up bags
Posted on Monday December 02, 2019

The vast majority of in-use make-up products such as beauty blenders, mascara and lip gloss are contaminated with potentially life threatening superbugs, new research has revealed.

Disclaimers on retouched photos don't solve problem of negative body image
Posted on Monday December 02, 2019

Labels that warn an image has been altered or enhanced do nothing to mitigate women's negative perceptions of their appearance, according to a new study. More importantly, some disclaimers heightened and even harmed body dissatisfaction in at-risk women, the study showed.

Dogs promote page turning for young readers
Posted on Monday December 02, 2019

Reading in the presence of a pooch may be the page-turning motivation young children need, suggests a researcher. A new study examines the behavior of 17 children from Grades 1 to 3 while reading with and without a dog.

Home urine test for prostate cancer could revolutionize diagnosis
Posted on Saturday November 30, 2019

A new home urine test for prostate cancer could revolutionize diagnosis -- according to new research. As well as diagnosing aggressive prostate cancer, the test predicts whether patients will require treatment up to five years earlier than standard clinical methods. It also means that men don't have to come into the clinic to provide a urine sample -- or have to undergo an uncomfortable rectal examination.

Placenta changes could mean male offspring of older moms more likely to develop heart problems
Posted on Thursday November 28, 2019

Changes occur in the placenta in older pregnant mothers leading to a greater likelihood of poor health in their male offspring, a study in rats has shown. Both male and female fetuses do not grow as large in older mothers, but there are sex-specific differences in changes to placental development and function. These are likely to play a central role in the increased likelihood of later-life heart problems and high blood pressure in males.

Politically extreme counties may act as magnets, migration patterns suggest
Posted on Wednesday November 27, 2019

In a study of county-to-county migration patterns in the US, researchers found that when people migrate, they tend to move to other counties that reflect their political preferences.

Student attitudes toward cheating may spill over into their careers
Posted on Wednesday November 27, 2019

A new study finds that students who tolerate cheating in the classroom may also turn a blind eye to unethical behavior in the workplace.

Guidebooks or grandmas? Where most moms get their pregnancy advice
Posted on Wednesday November 27, 2019

A new study says pregnant women still rely on their mothers despite what many self-help guidebooks recommend.

Mental practice may improve golfers' putting performance
Posted on Wednesday November 27, 2019

Researchers are lending support to Arnold Palmer's famous assertion that golf is predominantly played in 'the six inches between the ears'.

Experts call for more active prevention of tooth decay for children's teeth
Posted on Wednesday November 27, 2019

Three-year trial comparing three treatment strategies for tooth decay in children's teeth finds no evidence to suggest that conventional fillings are more successful than sealing decay into teeth, or using preventive methods alone. 43% of those participating in the study experienced toothache or dental infection regardless of the treatment received.


 

 

 

 

 

 

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