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Babies retain even detailed events during a nap
Posted on Tuesday April 07, 2020

While sleeping the brain goes through previously experienced things, consolidates new memory contents and summarizes similar experiences into more general knowledge. This also applies to babies. However, they can more than just generalize what they have learned. A recent study shows: during sleep a baby's brain also consolidates the details of its individual experience and protects them from generalization and is therefore also important for what is known as episodic memory.

Men pose more risk to other road users than women
Posted on Monday April 06, 2020

Men pose more risk to other road users than women do and they are more likely to drive more dangerous vehicles, reveals the first study of its kind.

Invasive species with charisma have it easier
Posted on Monday April 06, 2020

It's the outside that counts: Their charisma has an impact on the introduction and image of alien species and can even hinder their control. An international research team have investigated the influence of charisma on the management of invasive species.

US modelling study estimates impact of school closures for COVID-19 on US health-care workforce and associated mortality
Posted on Saturday April 04, 2020

US policymakers considering physical distancing measures to slow the spread of COVID-19 face a difficult trade-off between closing schools to reduce transmission and new cases, and potential health-care worker absenteeism due to additional childcare needs that could ultimately increase mortality from COVID-19, according to new modelling research.

Larger thighs associated with lower risk of heart disease in obesity
Posted on Saturday April 04, 2020

A larger thigh circumference may be associated with lower blood pressure and a reduced risk of heart disease in people with obesity, according to a new study. In overweight and obese Chinese men and women, larger thigh circumferences were associated with lower blood pressure. These findings suggest that carrying more weight on the thighs may be a marker of better heart health in Chinese obese and overweight people, who are at a greater risk of heart disease.

How important is speech in transmitting coronavirus?
Posted on Friday April 03, 2020

Normal speech by individuals who are asymptomatic but infected with coronavirus may produce enough aerosolized particles to transmit the infection, according to aerosol scientists. Although it's not yet known how important this is to the spread of COVID-19, it underscores the need for strict social distancing measures -- and for virologists, epidemiologists and engineers who study aerosols and droplets to work together on this and other respiratory diseases.

Wearing surgical masks in public could help slow COVID-19 pandemic's advance
Posted on Friday April 03, 2020

Surgical masks may help prevent infected people from making others sick with seasonal viruses, including coronaviruses, according to new research. In laboratory experiments, the masks significantly reduced the amounts of various airborne viruses coming from infected patients, measured using the breath-capturing 'Gesundheit II machine.'

People tune out facts and trust their guts in medical emergencies
Posted on Friday April 03, 2020

A new study shows that people are more likely to base decisions on anecdotal information instead of facts when they feel anxious and vulnerable.

COVID-19 pandemic may exacerbate childhood obesity
Posted on Friday April 03, 2020

Public health scientists predict that school closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic will exacerbate the epidemic of childhood obesity in the United States. Researchers expect that COVID-19-related school closures will double out-of-school time this year for many children in the US and will exacerbate risk factors for weight gain associated with summer recess.

Stress thwarts our ability to plan ahead by disrupting how we use memory
Posted on Friday April 03, 2020

Pairing brain scans with virtual-navigation tasks, researchers found that people make less efficient and effective plans when stressed.

Gardening helps to grow positive body image
Posted on Thursday April 02, 2020

New research has found that allotment gardening promotes positive body image, which measures someone's appreciation of their own body and its functions, and an acceptance of bodily imperfections.

Most people consider becoming vegetarian for their health
Posted on Thursday April 02, 2020

Researchers know that people are motivated to be vegetarian for different reasons -- the most common in western cultures being health, the environment and animal rights.

Lifestyle changes could delay memory problems in old age, depending on our genes
Posted on Thursday April 02, 2020

Researchers have shown that how we respond to changes in nutrients at a molecular level plays an important role in the aging process, and this is directed by some key genetic mechanisms.

Marijuana may impair female fertility
Posted on Thursday April 02, 2020

Female eggs exposed to THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, have an impaired ability to produce viable embryos, and are significantly less likely to result in a viable pregnancy, according to an animal study.

Using chemistry to unlock the difference between cold- and hot-brew coffee
Posted on Thursday April 02, 2020

Cold brew may be the hottest trend in coffee-making, but not much is known about how this process alters the chemical characteristics of the beverage. Now, scientists report that the content of potentially health-promoting antioxidants in coffee brewed without heat can differ significantly from a cup of joe prepared the traditional way, particularly for dark roasts.

Cocky kids: The four-year-olds with the same overconfidence as risk-taking bankers
Posted on Thursday April 02, 2020

Overconfidence in one's own abilities despite clear evidence to the contrary is present and persistent in children as young as four, a new study has revealed.

New treatment for childhood anxiety works by changing parent behavior
Posted on Thursday April 02, 2020

A study reports that an entirely parent-based treatment, SPACE (Supportive Parenting for Anxious Childhood Emotions), is as efficacious as individual cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of childhood and adolescent anxiety disorders.

Most diets lead to weight loss and lower blood pressure, but effects largely disappear after a year
Posted on Wednesday April 01, 2020

Reasonably good evidence suggests that most diets result in similar modest weight loss and improvements in cardiovascular risk factors over a period of six months, compared with a usual diet.

Urban dogs are more fearful than their cousins from the country
Posted on Wednesday April 01, 2020

Inadequate socialization, inactivity and an urban living environment are associated with social fearfulness in dogs. Among the most fearful breeds were the Shetland Sheepdog and the Spanish Water Dog, while Wheaten Terriers were one of the most fearless breeds.

Infants introduced early to solid foods show gut bacteria changes that may portend future health risks
Posted on Tuesday March 31, 2020

Infants who were started on solid foods at or before three months of age showed changes in the levels of gut bacteria and bacterial byproducts, called short-chain fatty acids, measured in their stool samples, according to a new study.

Regular exercise benefits immunity -- even in isolation
Posted on Tuesday March 31, 2020

A new analysis highlights the power of regular, daily exercise on our immune system and the importance of people continuing to work-out even in lockdown.

New UC Davis research suggests parents should limit screen media for preschoolers
Posted on Tuesday March 31, 2020

New research says screen time for young children should be limited.

Where in the brain does creativity come from? Evidence from jazz musicians
Posted on Tuesday March 31, 2020

A new brain-imaging study has studied the brain activity of jazz guitarists during improvisation to show that creativity is, in fact, driven primarily by the right hemisphere in musicians who are comparatively inexperienced at improvisation. However, musicians who are highly experienced at improvisation rely primarily on their left hemisphere.

Some mobile phone apps may contain hidden behaviors that users never see
Posted on Tuesday March 31, 2020

A team of cybersecurity researchers has discovered that a large number of cell phone applications contain hardcoded secrets allowing others to access private data or block content provided by users. The study's findings: that the apps on mobile phones might have hidden or harmful behaviors about which end users know little to nothing.

Experiences of undesired effects of hormonal contraception
Posted on Tuesday March 31, 2020

A study of women who experienced mental ill-health from a hormonal contraception indicates they value their mental well-being higher than a satisfactory sex life. Their experiences can influence their choice of contraception. This is one of four themes that researchers have identified in interviews with 24 women who experience negative effects of some hormonal contraception.

Consuming extra calories can help exercising women avoid menstrual disorders
Posted on Tuesday March 31, 2020

Exercising women who struggle to consume enough calories and have menstrual disorders can simply increase their food intake to recover their menstrual cycle, according to a new study.

The placebo effect and psychedelic drugs: Tripping on nothing?
Posted on Monday March 30, 2020

A new study suggests that, in the right context, some people may experience psychedelic-like effects from placebos alone. The researchers reported some of the strongest placebo effects on consciousness in the literature relating to psychedelic drugs. Indeed, 61% of the participants in the experiment reported some effect after consuming the placebo.

Movement toward gender equality has slowed in some areas, stalled in others
Posted on Monday March 30, 2020

Women have made progress in earning college degrees as well as in pay and in occupations once largely dominated by men since 1970 -- but the pace of gains in many areas linked to professional advancement has slowed in recent decades and stalled in others, finds a new five-decade analysis.

Chemicals used to replace BPA may lead to increased blood pressure
Posted on Monday March 30, 2020

Common bisphenol A (BPA) substitutes can affect the developing fetus and cause hypertension in later life, suggests a rodent study.

Experimental AI tool predicts which COVID-19 patients develop respiratory disease
Posted on Monday March 30, 2020

An artificial intelligence tool accurately predicted which patients newly infected with the COVID-19 virus would go on to develop severe respiratory disease, a new study found.

Hopes for pandemic respite this spring may depend upon what happens indoors
Posted on Monday March 30, 2020

How much spring and summer affect the COVID-19 pandemic may depend not only on the effectiveness of social distancing measures, but also on the environment inside our buildings, according to a new review on how respiratory viruses are transmitted.

How at risk are you of getting a virus on an airplane?
Posted on Monday March 30, 2020

Fair or not, airplanes have a reputation for germs. However, there are ways to minimize the risks. This research is especially used for air travel where there is an increased risk for contagious infection or disease, such as the recent worldwide outbreak of the coronavirus, which causes COVID-19 disease.

New research sheds light on potentially negative effects of cannabis
Posted on Monday March 30, 2020

Coughing fits, anxiety and paranoia are three of the most common adverse reactions to cannabis, according to a recent study.

The desire for information: Blissful ignorance or painful truth?
Posted on Monday March 30, 2020

A new study looks closely at why many people are so likely to avoid useful information -- even if it benefits their health. While creating a test that allows anyone to test their own preferences for seeking out or avoiding info, our researchers found, among other things, that impatient people are more likely to avoid learning information, preferring to avoid the prospect of immediate pain rather than make better long-term decisions.

How we perceive close relationships with others determines our willingness to share food
Posted on Monday March 30, 2020

Researchers said a better understanding of the links between attachment and food could potentially help inform efforts to extend help to people during the current coronavirus pandemic -- particularly among people with high attachment avoidance.

How social media makes it difficult to identify real news
Posted on Monday March 30, 2020

There's a price to pay when you get your news and political information from the same place you find funny memes and cat pictures, new research suggests. The study found that people viewing a blend of news and entertainment on a social media site tended to pay less attention to the source of content they consumed - meaning they could easily mistake satire or fiction for real news.

What are you looking at? 'Virtual' communication in the age of social distancing
Posted on Monday March 30, 2020

When discussions occur face-to-face, people know where their conversational partner is looking and vice versa. With ''virtual'' communication due to COVID-19 and the expansive use of mobile and video devices, now more than ever, it's important to understand how these technologies impact communication. Where do people focus their attention? The eyes, mouth, the whole face? And how do they encode conversation? A first-of-its-kind study set out to determine whether being observed affects people's behavior during online communication.

Some COVID-19 patients still have coronavirus after symptoms disappear
Posted on Friday March 27, 2020

Researchers found that half of the patients they treated for mild COVID-19 infection still had coronavirus for up to eight days after symptoms disappeared.

Interactive product labels require new regulations, study warns
Posted on Thursday March 26, 2020

Artificial intelligence will be increasingly used on labels on food and other products in the future to make them interactive, and regulations should be reformed now so they take account of new innovations, a study warns.

Validation may be best way to support stressed out friends and family
Posted on Thursday March 26, 2020

In uncertain times, supporting your friends and family can help them make it through. But your comforting words can have different effects based on how you phrase them, according to new research.

Why life can get better as we age
Posted on Thursday March 26, 2020

People say life gets better with age. Now research suggests this may be because older people have the wisdom and time to use mindfulness as a means to improve wellbeing. Healthy aging researchers say certain characteristics of mindfulness seem more strongly evident in older people compared to younger people - and suggest ways for all ages to benefit.

Engineers find ankle exoskeleton aids running
Posted on Wednesday March 25, 2020

Researchers find that a motorized device that attaches around the ankle and foot can drastically reduce the energy cost of running.

Too much salt weakens the immune system
Posted on Wednesday March 25, 2020

A high-salt diet is not only bad for one's blood pressure, but also for the immune system. Mice fed a high-salt diet were found to suffer from much more severe bacterial infections. Human volunteers who consumed additional six grams of salt per day also showed pronounced immune deficiencies. This amount corresponds to the salt content of two fast food meals.

Diet, nutrition have profound effects on gut microbiome
Posted on Wednesday March 25, 2020

A new literature review suggests that nutrition and diet have a profound impact on the microbial composition of the gut.

To stay positive, live in the moment -- but plan ahead
Posted on Wednesday March 25, 2020

A recent study finds that people who balance living in the moment with planning for the future are best able to weather daily stress without succumbing to negative moods.

Study shows how diligent we have to be to keep surfaces germ-free
Posted on Wednesday March 25, 2020

A recent study suggests that even organized efforts to clean surfaces can fall short, a reminder for us all that keeping our surroundings clean may require some additional work.

How to break new records in the 200 meters
Posted on Wednesday March 25, 2020

Usain Bolt's 200m record has not been beaten for ten years and Florence Griffith Joyner's for more than thirty years. And what about if the secret behind beating records was to use mathematics? Thanks to a mathematical model, researchers have proved that the geometry of athletic tracks could be optimized to improve records. They recommend to build shorter straights and larger radii in the future.

Mother/infant skin-to-skin touch boosts baby's brain development and function
Posted on Wednesday March 25, 2020

New research shows that extended use of Kangaroo Care, a skin-to-skin, chest-to-chest method of caring for a baby, can positively benefit full-term infants and their mothers, with important implications for post-partum depression.

Older people generally more emotionally healthy, better able to resist daily temptations
Posted on Wednesday March 25, 2020

Older people are generally more emotionally stable and better able to resist temptations in their daily lives, a new study says. Researchers pinged 123 study participants aged 20 to 80 on their cell phones three times a day for ten days. They indicated how they felt on a five-point scale for each of eight emotional states, including contentment, enthusiasm, relaxation and sluggishness, and whether they were craving chocolate, cigarettes or sex.

Elections: Early warning system to fight disinformation online
Posted on Wednesday March 25, 2020

A new project is an effort to combat the rise of coordinated social media campaigns to incite violence, sew discord and threaten the integrity of democratic elections.

How bacteria form communities on the human tongue
Posted on Wednesday March 25, 2020

Using a recently developed fluorescent imaging technique, researchers in the United States have developed high-resolution maps of microbial communities on the human tongue. The images reveal that microbial biofilms on the surface of the tongue have a complex, highly structured spatial organization.

Higher daily step count linked with lower all-cause mortality
Posted on Wednesday March 25, 2020

In a new study, higher daily step counts were associated with lower mortality risk from all causes.

Regular tub bathing linked to lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease
Posted on Wednesday March 25, 2020

Regular tub bathing is linked to a lower risk of death from heart disease and stroke, indicates a long term study, published online in the journal Heart.

Commonly used mouthwash could make saliva significantly more acidic, change microbes
Posted on Tuesday March 24, 2020

The first study looking at the effect of chlorhexidine mouthwash on the entire oral microbiome has found its use significantly increases the abundance of lactate-producing bacteria that lower saliva pH, and may increase the risk of tooth damage. "In the face of the recent COVID-19 outbreak many dentists are now using chlorhexidine as a pre-rinse before doing dental procedures. We urgently need more information on how it works on viruses," said one of the researchers.

Cannabis compound helps fight resistant bacteria
Posted on Tuesday March 24, 2020

Bacteria are increasingly becoming resistant to antibiotics. By combining antibiotics with the cannabis compound, cannabidiol, researchers have found a way to enhance the antibiotic effect.

More men, more problems? Not necessarily
Posted on Tuesday March 24, 2020

Men are more prone to competitive risk taking and violent behavior, so what happens when the number of men is greater than the number of women in a population? According to new research, the answers might not be what you expect.

Scientists investigate why females live longer than males
Posted on Tuesday March 24, 2020

An international team of scientists found that, like humans, female wild animals tend to live longer than males.

Past your bedtime? Inconsistency may increase risk to cardiovascular health
Posted on Tuesday March 24, 2020

Researchers found that individuals going to bed even 30 minutes later than their usual bedtime presented a significantly higher resting heart rate that lasted into the following day.

Brain or muscles, what do we lose first?
Posted on Tuesday March 24, 2020

From the age of 50, there is a decline not just in physical activity but also in cognitive abilities since the two are correlated. But which of them influences the other? Researchers used a database of over 100,000 people aged 50-90 whose physical and cognitive abilities were measured every two years for 12 years. The findings show that cognitive abilities ward off inactivity much more than physical activity prevents the decline in cognitive abilities.

How well do you know the back of your hand, really?
Posted on Tuesday March 24, 2020

Many of us are spending a lot of time looking at our hands lately and we think we know them pretty well. But research shows the way our brains perceive our hands is inaccurate.


 

 

 

 

 

 

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