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Technique identifies T cells primed for certain allergies or infections
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Researchers can now identify T cells reactive to a particular target from a patient's cells, and to perform high-throughput single-cell RNA sequencing of those cells.

Chronic opioid therapy can disrupt sleep, increase risk of sleep disorders
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Patients and medical providers should be aware that chronic opioid use can interfere with sleep by reducing sleep efficiency and increasing the risk of sleep-disordered breathing.

Daily cannabis use lowers odds of using illicit opioids among people who have chronic pain
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

For those using illicit opioids to manage their chronic pain, cannabis may be a beneficial -- and a less dangerous -- alternative, according to new research.

Evidence in mice that childhood asthma is influenced by the neurotransmitter dopamine
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Neurons that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine communicate with T cells to enhance allergic inflammation in the lungs of young mice but not older mice, researchers report. The findings potentially explain why asthma susceptibility is higher in children. By highlighting the important role of interactions between the nervous system and the immune system in childhood asthma, the results could lead to new strategies for treating the common chronic disease.

Yoga and physical therapy as treatment for chronic lower back pain also improves sleep
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Yoga and physical therapy (PT) are effective approaches to treating co-occurring sleep disturbance and back pain while reducing the need for medication, according to a new study. The research showed significant improvements in sleep quality lasting 52 weeks after 12 weeks of yoga classes or 1-on-1 PT, which suggests a long-term benefit of these non-pharmacologic approaches.

Catatonia in Down syndrome
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Down syndrome, due to an extra chromosome 21, occurs in 250,000 children and adults in the United States, making it the country's most common chromosomal disorder. Inherited heart defects, thyroid cancer, celiac disease and developmental disabilities are common Down syndrome complications. Only recently has catatonia, a behavioral condition marked by new onset immobility, mutism, withdrawal and other behavioral abnormalities, been recognized in Down syndrome.

Complex organ models grown in the lab
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Scientists have successfully produced human tissues from stem cells. They have a complexity similar to that of normal tissue and are far superior to previous structures.

RNA regulation is crucial for embryonic stem cell differentiation
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Nuclear RNA levels are kept in check by RNA decay factors. Now, researchers show that an excess of RNA in the nucleus can have negative effects on a crucial regulator of stem cell differentiation.

Ayahuasca compound changes brainwaves to vivid 'waking-dream' state
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Scientists have peered inside the brain to show how taking DMT affects human consciousness by significantly altering the brain's electrical activity.

Watch out for 'feather duvet lung' caution doctors
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Watch out for 'feather duvet lung' doctors have warned after treating a middle aged man with severe lung inflammation that developed soon after he bought feather-filled bedding.

Hear this: Healthful diet tied to lower risk of hearing loss
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Investigators have found that eating a healthy diet may reduce the risk of acquired hearing loss.

New screening method identifies inhibitors of cancer cell metabolism
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

A new screening system developed by scientists leverages redundancy in an important component of a cell - nucleotide metabolism - to help identify new drugs that specifically and potently block processes that are essential for cancer cell growth.

Get over it? When it comes to recycled water, consumers won't
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

If people are educated on recycled water, they may come to agree it's perfectly safe and tastes as good -- or better -- than their drinking water. They may even agree it's an answer to the critical water imbalance in California. But that doesn't mean they're going to use recycled water -- and it sure doesn't mean they'll drink it. And the reason lies in the word 'disgust.'

Benefits of exercise referral schemes not as large as hoped
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Exercise referral schemes are associated with many improvements in health and wellbeing, but the changes aren't as large as hoped, finds an analysis of outcomes data.

Scientists and schoolkids find family soups have antimalarial properties
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

London schoolchildren have found -- with the help of scientists -- that some of their families' soup recipes have antimalarial properties.

Research reveals no link between statins and memory loss
Posted on Tuesday November 19, 2019

Over 6 years, researchers evaluated the cognitive effects of statins in elderly consumers, revealing no negative impact and potential protective effects in those at risk of dementia.

Older adults and wearable activity trackers
Posted on Monday November 18, 2019

For older adults, wearable activity trackers may be popular gifts, but they may not be used for very long. While counterintuitive, engaging in competition with family and friends decreases the odds of long-term use among older adults, perhaps because they feel it's demotivating, according to a new study.

Mechanism connects early binge drinking to adult behaviors
Posted on Monday November 18, 2019

Intermittent exposure to high levels of alcohol in adolescent animals leads to increased levels of microRNA-137 in the brains of adults. Blocking microRNA-137 helps to reverse or the lasting effects of youth drinking, such as increased alcohol use and anxiety.

Switching to renewable energy could save thousands of lives in Africa
Posted on Monday November 18, 2019

New research finds that if Africa chooses a future powered by fossil fuels, nearly 50,000 people could die prematurely each year from fossil fuel emissions by 2030, mostly in South Africa, Nigeria and Malawi.

HIV drug exposure in womb may increase child risk of microcephaly, developmental delays
Posted on Monday November 18, 2019

Children born to women on HIV therapy containing the drug efavirenz were 2 to 2.5 times more likely to have microcephaly, or small head size, compared to children born to women on regimens of other antiretroviral drugs, according to a new analysis. The children with microcephaly also had a higher risk for developmental delays, compared to children with normal head size.

AI could transform how we monitor the structural health of civil infrastructure
Posted on Monday November 18, 2019

Scientists have developed a new machine learning algorithm (AI) that could transform the way we monitor major infrastructure - such as dams and bridges.

'Bad cholesterol' is only as unhealthy as its composition
Posted on Monday November 18, 2019

New research shows that a particular subclass of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) is a much better predictor of potential heart attacks than the mere presence of LDL.

People in counties with worse economies are more likely to die from heart disease
Posted on Monday November 18, 2019

Communities in the United States that experienced the most economic distress in the wake of the Great Recession saw a significant increase in death rates from heart disease and strokes among middle-aged people. While the death rates remained nearly unchanged in counties with the least economic distress, areas experiencing worsening economic trends saw a sharp increase, from 122 deaths per 100,000 residents in 2010 to 127.6 deaths in 2015.

Gut microbiota imbalance promotes the onset of colorectal cancer
Posted on Monday November 18, 2019

Researchers have demonstrated that an imbalance in the gut microbiota, also known as 'dysbiosis', promotes the onset of colorectal cancer. The teams demonstrated that transplanting fecal flora from patients with colon cancer into mice caused lesions and epigenetic changes characteristic of the development of a malignant tumor. The pilot study led to the development of a non-invasive blood test which identifies the epigenetic phenomenon associated with dysbiosis. The test was validated in 1,000 individuals.

Directional control of self-propelled protocells
Posted on Monday November 18, 2019

Synthetic protocells can be made to move toward and away from chemical signals, an important step for the development of new drug-delivery systems that could target specific locations in the body.

Opioid prescription doses are increasingly being tapered, often more rapidly than recommended
Posted on Monday November 18, 2019

Stigma and safety fears have made daily dose tapering of opioid prescriptions more common. New research, however, shows tapering can occur at rates as much as six times higher than recommended, putting patients at risk of withdrawal, uncontrolled pain or mental health crises.

Experimental cholesterol-lowering drug effective at lowering bad cholesterol, study shows
Posted on Monday November 18, 2019

Twice-yearly injections of an experimental cholesterol-lowering drug, inclisiran, were effective at reducing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, often called bad cholesterol, in patients already taking the maximum dose of statin drugs.

Side effects mild, brief with single antidepressant dose of intravenous ketamine
Posted on Monday November 18, 2019

Researchers found that a single, low-dose ketamine infusion was relatively free of side effects for patients with treatment-resistant depression. Widespread off-label use of intravenous subanesthetic-dose ketamine has raised concerns about side effects, especially given its history as a drug of abuse. The most common short-term side effect of the rapid-acting treatment was 'feeling strange or loopy.'

Clearing damaged cells out of the body helps heal diabetics' blood vessels
Posted on Monday November 18, 2019

New research shows that ramping up one of the body's waste disposal system, called autophagy, helps heal the blood vessels of diabetics.

Possible new treatment strategy against progeria
Posted on Monday November 18, 2019

Progeria is a very rare disease that affects about one in 18 million children and results in premature aging and death in adolescence from complications of cardiovascular disease. In a study on mice and human cells, researchers have identified how antisense oligonucleotide therapies could be used as a new possible treatment option for the disease.

Teens with heart disease improve exercise capacity in large clinical trial
Posted on Sunday November 17, 2019

The largest-ever clinical trial of a medication for pediatric cardiology patients found that an oral drug significantly improved exercise capacity in adolescent patients with severe, congenital single-ventricle heart defects. A study leader says the physiologic benefits represent a milestone in the care of those who have undergone the Fontan procedure, a palliative operation for single-ventricle disease.

Researchers discover new mutations in gene associated with disease that causes the heart to weaken
Posted on Sunday November 17, 2019

Researchers from the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City have identified new mutations in a gene commonly associated with non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDC), a disease that weakens the heart muscle, making it more difficult to adequately circulate blood to meet the body's needs.

Omega-3 shows protection against heart disease-related death, without prostate cancer risk
Posted on Sunday November 17, 2019

A research team identified 87 patients who were part of the Intermountain INSPIRE Registry and had developed prostate cancer. These patients were also tested for plasma levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), which are two common omega-3 fatty acids.

Better understanding of soft artificial muscles
Posted on Saturday November 16, 2019

Artificial muscles will power the soft robots and wearable devices of the future. But more needs to be understood about the underlying mechanics of these powerful structures in order to design and build new devices. Now, researchers have uncovered some of the fundamental physical properties of artificial muscle fibers.

Link between inflammation and mental sluggishness shown in new study
Posted on Saturday November 16, 2019

Scientists have uncovered a possible explanation for the mental sluggishness that often accompanies illness.

Ketogenic diet helps tame flu virus
Posted on Saturday November 16, 2019

A high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet like the Keto regimen has its fans, but influenza apparently isn't one of them. Mice fed a ketogenic diet were better able to combat the flu virus than mice fed food high in carbohydrates, according to a new study.

New finding offers possibility for preventing age-related metabolic disease
Posted on Saturday November 16, 2019

A study has uncovered why belly fat surrounding organs increases as people age, a finding that could offer new treatment possibilities for improving metabolic health, thereby reducing the likelihood for diseases like diabetes and atherosclerosis that stem from inflammation.

How fibrosis progresses in the human lung
Posted on Saturday November 16, 2019

A study boosts scientific understanding of how the lung disease idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) progresses, providing a roadmap for researchers to discover new treatment targets for the disease.

Bacterial protein impairs important cellular processes
Posted on Friday November 15, 2019

Researchers have discovered a new function of antibiotic resistant bacteria.

New cell therapy improves memory and stops seizures following TBI
Posted on Friday November 15, 2019

Researchers have developed a breakthrough cell therapy to improve memory and prevent seizures in mice following traumatic brain injury.

Fecal transplantation to treat patients with Parkinson's disease: Hope or hype?
Posted on Friday November 15, 2019

Constipation is a common complaint in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Fecal microbiome transplantation (FMT) and pre- and probiotics are potential options for treating constipation and restoring the microbiome of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), but scientists warn that clinical data are scarce, and more research is needed before supporting their use.

Direct-to-patient telemedicine cardiology follow-ups may safely save families time, cost
Posted on Friday November 15, 2019

Health provider follow-ups delivered via computer or smartphone is a feasible alternative to in-person patient follow-ups for some pediatric cardiac conditions, according to the new findings.

Scientists close in on malaria vaccine
Posted on Friday November 15, 2019

Scientists have taken another big step forward towards developing a vaccine that's effective against the most severe forms of malaria.

Many patients with iNPH develop Alzheimer's disease, too
Posted on Friday November 15, 2019

Up to one in five patients treated for idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, iNPH, also develop Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study. The researchers were able to predict the development of Alzheimer's disease by using the Disease State Index, DSI, that combines patient-specific data from various sources.

Researchers link sisters' paralysis to an 'extremely rare' genetic variant
Posted on Friday November 15, 2019

Following a nearly 25-year search across three continents, parents of a pair of sisters -- who as children slowly became paralyzed from the waist down -- finally have a diagnosis. Thanks to a chance viewing on French TV of a story about another physically disabled child who regained her mobility after being diagnosed at TGen, the parents of the two sisters contacted TGen, hoping to end their decades-long diagnostic odyssey.

Master regulator in mitochondria is critical for muscle function and repair
Posted on Friday November 15, 2019

New study identifies how loss of mitochondrial protein MICU1 disrupts calcium balance and causes muscle atrophy and weakness.

Early DNA lineages shed light on the diverse origins of the contemporary population
Posted on Friday November 15, 2019

A new genetic study demonstrates that, at the end of the Iron Age, Finland was inhabited by separate and differing populations, all of them influencing the gene pool of modern Finns. The study is so far the most extensive investigation of the ancient DNA of people inhabiting the region of Finland.

Mapping disease outbreaks in urban settings using mobile phone data
Posted on Friday November 15, 2019

A new study into the interplay between mobility and the 2013 and 2014 dengue outbreaks in Singapore has uncovered a legal void around access to mobile phone data -- information that can prove vital in preventing the spread of infectious diseases.

Life experience critical for managing Type 2 diabetes
Posted on Friday November 15, 2019

Researchers found that age plays a critical role in the well-being of people newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, with younger patients more susceptible to psychological distress resulting in worse health outcomes.

Scientists discover how the molecule-sorting station in our cells is formed and maintained
Posted on Friday November 15, 2019

A recent study by a group of scientists has revealed that a different mechanism is responsible for the formation and maintenance of the cell organelle called endosome that sorts and distributes substances entering a cell. Contrary to current knowledge in the field, the scientists show that the functioning of the Golgi is crucial for this organelle's upkeep. This result can ultimately help improve treatments for some diseases.

People who cannot read may be three times as likely to develop dementia
Posted on Thursday November 14, 2019

New research has found that people who are illiterate, meaning they never learned to read or write, may have nearly three times greater risk of developing dementia than people who can read and write.

Genetics may determine who benefits from broccoli's effects on kidney health
Posted on Thursday November 14, 2019

Deletion of the gene that codes for an enzyme called GSTM1 increased kidney injury in mice with hypertension and kidney disease, but supplementing the diet with broccoli powder lessened kidney injury in the genetically altered mice. In humans, high consumption of broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables was linked with a lower risk of kidney failure, primarily in individuals lacking GSTM1.

Wearable and implantable devices may transform care for patients with kidney failure
Posted on Thursday November 14, 2019

Wearable and implantable devices may allow for intensive self-care for patients with kidney failure outside of the clinic.

How Crohn's disease-associated bacteria tolerate antibiotics
Posted on Thursday November 14, 2019

Bacteria associated with Crohn's disease rely on multiple stress responses to survive, multiply, and tolerate antibiotics within white blood cells called macrophages, according to a new study.

Discovery reveals mechanism that turns herpes virus on and off
Posted on Thursday November 14, 2019

New research has identified a new mechanism that plays a role in controlling how the herpes virus alternates between dormant and active stages of infection.

Engineers creating miniaturized, wireless oxygen sensor for sick infants
Posted on Thursday November 14, 2019

Researchers are developing a sensor the size of a Band-Aid that will measure a baby's blood oxygen levels, a vital indication of the lungs' effectiveness and whether the baby's tissue is receiving adequate oxygen supply. Unlike current systems used in hospitals, this miniaturized wearable device will be flexible and stretchable, wireless, inexpensive, and mobile -- possibly allowing the child to leave the hospital and be monitored remotely.

Faster, stronger rabies vaccine
Posted on Thursday November 14, 2019

Every year, more than 59,000 people around the world die of rabies and there remains no cheap and easy vaccine regimen to prevent the disease in humans. Now, researchers report that adding a specific immune molecule to a rabies vaccine can boost its efficacy.

Zika virus can cause immune and brain abnormalities in asymptomatic pig offspring
Posted on Thursday November 14, 2019

Zika virus infection in the womb produces altered immune responses and sex-specific brain abnormalities in apparently healthy pig offspring, according to a new study.

Restoring protein homeostasis improves memory deficits in Down syndrome model
Posted on Thursday November 14, 2019

Researchers found that that defects in a conserved stress pathway known as the 'integrated stress response,' or ISR, could explain the cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Down syndrome.

How maternal Zika virus infection results in newborn microcephaly
Posted on Thursday November 14, 2019

Researchers have discovered that the Zika virus protein NS4A disrupts brain growth by hijacking a pathway that regulates the generation of new neurons.


 

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